Home > srebrenica massacre > MIND OF A SICK MONSTER: TRIAL OF CHEMICAL TOLIMIR

MIND OF A SICK MONSTER: TRIAL OF CHEMICAL TOLIMIR

September 19, 2007

FORMER SERB GENERAL WHO PROPOSED GASSING SREBRENICA WOMEN & CHILDREN WITH CHEMICAL WEAPONS IS COMPULSIVELY OBSESSED WITH HIS ‘RIGHTS’

Photo of Serb Gen Zdravko Tolimir (aka: Chemical Tolimir) who proposed use of chemical weapons to gas Srebrenica women, children and elderly.

Quck intro: At his initial appearance before an ICTY judge (the International Criminal Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia at the Hague), the accused Zdravko Tolimir refused to state his name and date of birth. During his court appearances, he kept refusing to enter his plea. He repeatedly complained about his “unlawful” arrest, forgeting that he was an international fugitive from justice – charged with genocide over Srebrenica massacre. He kept complaining about his poor health, alleging he had three strokes and lost 26 kilos (later he would contradict himself by telling judge he is in perfect health). He prevented the court deputy’s attempt to put headphones on his ears so he could listen translation of charges against him – eight counts in the indictment charging him with genocide, crimes against humanity and violations of laws and customs of war. He even pretended he can’t read in “Latin” alphabet, but he was caught in a lie, yet another time. His arrogance, endless complaints, obsession over his ‘rights’, and total ignorance toward brutal suffering of his victims – made him look as disgusting as he can get. At Srebrenica Genocide Blog, we wonder: Has this horrible, inhuman piece of garbage, ever wondered about the rights of his victims whom he proposed to be gassed with chemical weapons?

Full story continues bellow….

During 2006 opening statements, the U.N. Prosecutor Peter McCloskey stated that “criminal orders in war are as a rule issued verbally”, and that a few exceptions existed to the rule. One of the most striking ones is a report sent on 21 July 1995 by the Serb General Zdravko Tolimir from Zepa to General Radomir Miletic, acting Chief of General Staff of the Bosnian Serb Army (VRS) . Tolimir was requesting help to crush some Bosnian military strongholds, expressing his view that “the best way to do it would be to use chemical weapons”. In the same report, Chemical Tolimir went even further, proposing chemical strikes against refugee columns of women, children and elderly leaving Zepa, because that would “force the Muslim fighters to surrender quickly”, in his opinion.

The total Serbian chemical weapons arsenal contained sarin, mustard gas, BZ, CN and CS gases (all in large quantities), together with phosgene, chlorine picric acid, cyanogen chloride, adamsite, lewisite, and other materials, often only in laboratory quantities.

In 1995, a team of the U.S. Defense Department experts interviewed a number of Srebrenica survivors in the summer of 1996, and concluded that their accounts supported allegations of the use of chemical incapacitants. The conclusion was deemed highly significant by the department. This information was sent up the chain of command. In late 1996, the U.S. intelligence community had information that chemical weapons may have been used in Srebrenica. A large investigation, which included physical sampling, was undertaken in late 1996 or early 1997 by the U.S. Government. The results of this investigation are not known to us. One official told Human Rights Watch in December 1996 that ”we do not see an advantage in declassifying those documents relating to chemical weapons use in Bosnia. We have spoken with people and received assurances that other channels are being pursued that we believe would be more effective and achieve a more favorable outcome than simply publicizing theme.” That is where it’s been left.

The May 31 2007 arrest of Zdravko Tolimir was hailed by international officials and Bosnia’s Republika Srpska government as a breakthrough in the hunt for wartime fugitives. Tolimir, who was Mladic’s assistant for intelligence and security in the VRS Main Staff, is charged with genocide and other crimes in July 1995 in Srebrenica and Zepa.

The tip was vague but promising. “One of the accused could be attempting to cross the border near the village of Bratunac” was the message relayed to Dragan Milosevic, chief police investigator in Republika Srpska, the Serb-governed sector of Bosnia. “The accused,” Milosevic recalled in an interview, could have referred only to five Bosnian Serb fugitives charged with committing crimes against humanity during their country’s 1992-95 ethnic civil war.

Milosevic and two dozen of his officers proceeded to the small farming village, where they came upon a sickly-looking man in a baseball cap, walking alone on a dirt road. They recognized him as Zdravko Tolimir, a former Bosnian Serb commander who had helped lead the systematic massacre of 8,000 Bosniak prisoners at Srebrenica in July 1995.

“We asked, ‘Are you the one we’re looking for?’ ” Milosevic recalled in Banja Luka, the capital of Republika Srpska. “He didn’t resist. He said, ‘I am the general, but don’t expect me to talk to any of you. You are my enemies, the collaborators.’ He still lives in the war and thinks of us as traitors. It looked like he’d been abandoned there.”

At his initial appearance before an ICTY judge (the International Criminal Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia at the Hague), the accused Zdravko Tolimir refused to state his name and date of birth. During his court appearances, he kept refusing to enter his plea. He repeatedly complained about his “unlawful” arrest, forgeting that he was an international fugitive from justice – charged with genocide over Srebrenica massacre. He kept complaining about his poor health, alleging he had three strokes and lost 26 kilos (later he would contradict himself by telling judge he is in perfect health). He prevented the court deputy’s attempt to put headphones on his ears so he could listen translation of charges against him – eight counts in the indictment charging him with genocide, crimes against humanity and violations of laws and customs of war. He even pretended he can’t read in “Latin” alphabet, but he was caught in a lie, yet another time. His arrogance, endless complaints, obsession over his ‘rights’, and total ignorance toward brutal suffering of his victims – made him look as disgusting as he can get. At Srebrenica Genocide Blog, we wonder: Has this horrible, inhuman piece of garbage, ever wondered about the rights of his victims whom he proposed to be gassed with chemical weapons?

During his latest appearance on September 14th 2007 – in a clear provocation to the victims and the Court – Chemical Tolimir prayed briefly for the ‘salvation’ of all those in any way connected with the International Criminal Tribunal at the Hague – and then he continued presenting his demands. Instead of apologizing to the victims and asking their forgiveness, this sick individual has been wasting Court’s time since his arrest. He continued his provocations by pretending he cannot read in “Latin” (which is used in both Bosnian and Croatian languages) and demanding to be given all documents in ‘Serbian and in Cyrillic’. After wasting Court’s time on Tolimir’s endless complaints and demands, pre-trial judge Kimberly Prost caught him lying and concluded the accused was ‘able to understand the documents in Serbian and in the Roman alphabet’.

In an effort to prove the opposite, Tolimir demanded that the documents be disclosed to him in Macedonian or Russian (totally different languages), because the Roman alphabets was ‘too tiring’ for him.

When the judge asked him the usual question about his health, the accused contradicted his earlier statements and now claimed that he was “in perfect health”.

Trial continues…

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  1. Owen
    September 22, 2007 at 9:29 pm

    I didn’t realise that samples had in fact been taken and presumably analysed. I wonder what the prosecution will make of this missing evidence and its recalcitrant keepers?

  2. Kirk Johnson
    September 27, 2007 at 4:50 pm

    What a loathsome individual. I think the Milosevic who arrested him has it right–he’s still living in the war.

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