Home > srebrenica massacre > CHILD VICTIMS IN ZAKLOPACA MASS GRAVE: THE YOUNGEST CHILD VICTIM 5 YEAR OLD NAIDA HODZIC (FUNERAL PHOTOS)

CHILD VICTIMS IN ZAKLOPACA MASS GRAVE: THE YOUNGEST CHILD VICTIM 5 YEAR OLD NAIDA HODZIC (FUNERAL PHOTOS)

June 23, 2008

Quick Intro: The war in Bosnia-Herzegovina started in 1992 when the Serb forces, supported by Belgrade, started attacking Bosniak villages around Srebrenica, in Eastern Bosnia, and summarily executing Bosniak women and children. Zaklopaca village is located just outside of Srebrenica, in Vlasenica area… It’s a place where Bosniak women, children and elderly men were brutally massacred… continue reading:

In May 2004, forensic experts have exhumed remains of 72 Bosniak victims, including 16 children and 10 women, summarily executed by the Bosnian Serb forces in the village of Zaklopaca in Vlasenica area – just outside of Srebrenica – at the outbreak of the 1992-95 war. The bodies were first buried in Zaklopaca, but later dug up, moved about two kilometers away and covered by heavy stone blocks to cover up the crime.

On June 21, 2008, Bosnia’s Federal News Agency reported that 55 DNA identified Bosniak victims from Zaklopaca mass grave have been finally laid to rest. The youngest victim was 5-year old Naida Hodzic and the oldest victim was 62-year old Fatima Berbic.

PHOTO CAPTION #1: Bosnian Muslim woman weeps near the coffins of victims exhumed from mass graves during a funeral ceremony in the village of Zaklopaca in Vlasenica area, just outside of Srebrenica, on Saturday, June 21, 2008. Some 5,000 Bosniaks gathered for the funeral ceremony for 55 Bosniak women, children, and men killed by Bosnian Serbs at the beginning of Bosnian war in May 1992.


PHOTO CAPTION #2: Bosnian Muslim woman is comforted as she cries by a grave of her loved one during a mass funeral in Zaklopaca June 21, 2008. Thousands of Bosniaks gathered for a mass funeral for 55 people killed in their village by Serb forces in 1992, whose bodies were then found in different mass graves more than a decade after the end of the country’s war.

PHOTO CAPTION #3: Bosniak men carry the coffin of one of victims exhumed from a mass grave during funeral ceremony in the village of Zaklopaca, on Saturday, June 21, 2008. Five thousand Bosniaks gathered at the funeral ceremony for 55 Bosniak women, children, and men killed by Bosnian Serbs at the beginning of Bosnian war in May 1992. All of the bodies were found and exhumed from mass grave sites.

PHOTO CAPTION #4: Bosniak men carry the coffin of one of victims exhumed from a mass grave during funeral ceremony in the village of Zaklopaca, on Saturday, June 21, 2008. Five thousand Bosniaks gathered at the funeral ceremony for 55 Bosniak women, children, and men killed by Bosnian Serbs at the beginning of Bosnian war in May 1992. All of the bodies were found and exhumed from mass grave sites.

PHOTO CAPTION #5: Bosnian Muslim women watch men bury their relatives during a mass funeral in Zaklopaca June 21, 2008. Thousands of Bosniaks gathered for a mass funeral for 55 Bosniak women, children, and men killed in their village by Serb forces in 1992, whose bodies were then found in different mass graves more than a decade after the end of the country’s war.

PHOTO CAPTION #6: Bosnian Muslims pray near fresh graves during a mass funeral in Zaklopaca June 21, 2008. Thousands of Bosniaks gathered for a mass funeral for 55 Bosniak women, children,and men killed in their village by Serb forces in 1992, whose bodies were then found in different mass graves more than a decade after the end of the country’s war.

PHOTO CAPTION #7: Bosnian Muslims pray near fresh graves during a mass funeral in Zaklopaca June 21, 2008. Thousands of Bosniaks gathered for a mass funeral for 55 Bosniak women, children,and men killed in their village by Serb forces in 1992, whose bodies were then found in different mass graves more than a decade after the end of the country’s war.

PHOTO CAPTION #8: A Bosnian Muslim priest adjusts one of 55 coffins prepared for a mass funeral in Zaklopaca June 21, 2008. Thousands of Bosniaks gathered for a mass funeral for 55 Bosniak women, children, and men killed in their village by Serb forces in 1992, whose bodies were then found in different mass graves more than a decade after the end of the country’s war.

PHOTO CAPTION #9: Bosniak men carry the coffin of one of victims exhumed from a mass grave during funeral ceremony in the village of Zaklopaca, on Saturday, June 21, 2008. Five thousand Bosniaks gathered at the funeral ceremony for 55 Bosniak women, children, and men killed by Bosnian Serbs at the beginning of Bosnian war in May 1992. All of the bodies were found and exhumed from mass grave sites.

PHOTO CAPTION #10: Bosnian Muslim woman weeps near the coffins of Bosniak victims exhumed from mass grave sites, during a funeral ceremony in the village of Zaklopaca on Saturday June 21, 2008. Five thousand Bosniaks gathered at funeral ceremony for 55 Bosniak women, children, and men killed by Bosnian Serbs at the beginning of Bosnian war in May 1992. All of the bodies were found and exhumed from mass grave sites.

PHOTO CAPTION #11: Bosniak women weep near the coffins of victims exhumed from a mass grave, during a funeral ceremony in the village of Zaklopaca on Saturday, June 21, 2008. Five thousand Bosniaks gathered at funeral ceremony for 55 Bosniak women, children, and men killed by Bosnian Serbs at the beginning of Bosnian war in May 1992. All of the bodies were found and exhumed from mass grave sites.

  1. Owen
    June 24, 2008 at 8:07 am

    From Tadeusz Mazowiecki’s report to the Commission on Human Rights Forty-ninth Session, E/CN.4/1993/50, 10 February 1993
    http://www.haverford.edu/relg/sells/reports/mazowiecki_10feb93.htm

    “37. Zaklopaca is a village near the town of Vlasenica in eastern Bosnia which had a mainly Muslim population of about 150 prior to the conflict. Reports state that on 16 May 1992, at least 83 Muslim men, women and children were arbitrarily executed by Serb forces there. Surviving eye-witnesses have provided the names of 83 victims but one witness reportedly counted 105 bodies including 10 members of one family, 8 members of another and 7 members of a third. Witnesses were returning from the fields at about 5 p.m. when the first of seven or eight cars carrying Serb forces arrived. One car reportedly had the word pokolj (massacre) written on it.”

  2. Owen
    June 24, 2008 at 11:27 am

    From the judgment against Momcilo Krajisnik (ICTY Case Ref. IT-00-39/40):

    “5.2.2 Legal findings
    717. Based on the evidence received, the Chamber finds that approximately 3,000 Muslims and Croats were killed in 30 municipalities during the indictment period. To
    avoid any misunderstanding, the Chamber notes that this is not a historical finding, but a legal one. The Chamber is bound to make its findings exclusively on the basis of the evidence received. This finding does not therefore exclude for the possibility that more Muslims and Croats were killed in these municipalities during the relevant time period. For purposes of this judgement, however, the Chamber may only take into account those specific killings which were proven beyond a reasonable doubt. The Chamber further notes that the number of killings mentioned in this paragraph does not include killings in such incidents where, on the basis of the evidence, the Chamber was unable to assess the definite number of victims.

    720. Extermination. The Chamber finds that for the following incidents of killings, the element of mass scale is fulfilled, considering the number of deaths in each incident and the circumstances surrounding the deaths, including the selection of the victims, the time and place of the killings, and the manner in which the killings were carried out. Incidents where large numbers of persons were killed under circumstances that were not sufficiently clear to the Chamber have not been included. The following killings on a mass scale have been proven:

    Vlasenica (NE): Twenty Muslim men, all but three in the village of Drum, killed in a few minutes by Serb soldiers moving house to house during the attack on 2 June 1992 [A17.1]; **approximately 80 men, women, and children killed by Serb soldiers and police, while attempting to flee the attack on the village of Zaklopača on 16 May 1992 [A17.2]**; the 140-150 remaining Muslim detainees from Sušica camp removed in four bus loads on 30 September 1992 and executed by three MUP officers; and twenty-nine Muslim detainees from the Vlasenica police station taken by bus to the outskirts of the village of Nova Kasaba and shot dead by Serb soldiers on 21 May 1992, after which the soldiers searched for survivors and shot them in the head [B19.2].

    Others indicted on charges relating to the killings at Zaklopaca include Slobodan Milosevic and Radovan Karadzic.

  3. rbih4ever
    June 25, 2008 at 8:34 am

    And despite all these acts of Genocide by the Serbs their para-state, the so called Republic of the Serbs, lives on and is getting stronger every day.
    The Serb leaders are often openly calling for the final end to the Bosnian state.

    The International Community keeps silent.
    No punishment whatsoever.

    Genocide, it seems, pays off in the end.

  4. Sarah Franco
    June 27, 2008 at 2:14 pm

    just a comment on a side issue regarding this post:

    the photos: I don’t know how to cope with them, I mean, it’s very dificult to trace the frontier betweent the due respect for people’s right to privacy and the importance of publishing photos that depict moments of sufering.

    I have to say that the selection of photos for this post seems to me to have successfuly respected the privacy of the deceiced and the people who attended… I am just sharing an anguish that I have, as an amateur photographer (who aspires to be more that an amateur photographer, but rather a person who uses images and words to pass a certain message).

  5. Owen
    June 27, 2008 at 6:25 pm

    The link to the Mazowiecki report at UNHCR is http://www.unhchr.ch/huridocda/huridoca.nsf/f247c38438f0ddcdc
    12569910037e669/c0a6cfd5274508fd802567900036da9a?OpenDocument

  6. Anonymous
    July 24, 2008 at 5:19 pm

    I did not realize how horrific the crimes were until I read it all on my computer. My heart goes out to the children and the families who suffered. I hope the people that did these crimes are brought to justice.Very sad in Michigan,usa

  7. NiDa
    April 28, 2009 at 9:03 pm

    Actually Naida was only 3.
    My little cusin! On that day I laid to rest my five uncles, my grandfather, cusin who was 16, and other relatives and neighbors.

    Thank you for the post – We cannot let people forget!

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