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LIST OF SUSPECTS: GETTING AWAY WITH GENOCIDE

October 3, 2007 1 comment

THE U.S. COURTS CHARGE SREBRENICA GENOCIDE SUSPECTS FOR IMMIGRATION FRAUD, BUT FAIL TO PROSECUTE THEM FOR WAR CRIMES

An Akron man was convicted Tuesday of lying about his service in a notorious Bosnian Serb army unit that massacred thousands of people during the war in the former Yugoslavia more than a decade ago.

Ratko Maslenjak and his family settled in Akron in 2000, but the man had a secret, federal prosecutors said: He served in the Bosnian Serb army and did not tell immigration officers when he applied for refugee status and later for a green card. Maslenjak thus kept officials from scrutinizing his past and possibly barring him from the United States, Assistant U.S. Attorney Phillip Tripi said.

Ratko Maslenjak, 48, belonged to a brigade connected to the Srebrenica massacre of 1995, prosecutors said. An estimated 8,000 Bosniaks were executed and thousands more driven from the United Nations-designated safe haven.

Duty rosters presented by prosecutors during a five-day trial revealed that Maslenjak served that year as a company commander. International investigators uncovered the rosters in Bosnia and Herzegovina during a war crimes probe.

Jurors heard little about the Srebrenica genocide or about Maslenjak’s specific duties. U.S. District Judge Solomon Oliver Jr. repeatedly told jurors that Maslenjak was on trial for immigration violations, not war crimes.

Defense lawyers argued that the Bosnian Serb army, also known as the VRS, drafted Maslenjak during the war between Bosnian Serbs, Bosniaks and Croats. The fighting ravaged the former Yugoslavia in the 1990s.

Maslenjak’s lawyers claimed that he failed to disclose his VRS duty because of alleged flaws in translation. Maslenjak does not speak or read English.

Maslenjak remained stoic Tuesday as he listened to the verdict through an interpreter. His wife Divna and pastor, the Rev. Dragomir Tuba, covered their faces in distress when a clerk announced the decision.

Maslenjak will be sentenced next year on the criminal charges and remains free on bond. He is also facing deportation.

Here is an incomplete list of Srebrenica genocide suspects who were (so far) arrested in the United States and charged only with immigration fraud, even though there was clear evidence of their involvement in the Srebrenica genocide – as confirmed by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement:

Sekula Bilic, indicted on one count of immigration fraud and one count of making false statements (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Zdravko Kordic, indicted on one count of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Branko Popic, indicted on one count of immigration fraud and one count of making false statements (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Ostoja Saric, indicted on one count of immigration fraud and one count of making false statements (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Strahinja Krsmanovic, indicted on one count of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Boro Stojanovic, indicted on one count of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Jadranko Gostic, indicted on one count of unlawful procurement of citizenship and one count of making false statements (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Zoran Radic, indicted on one count of immigration fraud and making false statements. Radic remains at large (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Dusan Bosnjak, (remains at large) indicted on one count of immigration fraud and making false statements (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Bogdan Panic, (remains at large) indicted on one count of naturalization fraud and making false statements (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Nedjo Ikonic, charged with one count of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Milivoje Jankovic, indicted on two counts of immigration fraud and two counts of making false statements (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Veselin Vidacak, indicted on two counts of immigration fraud and two counts of making false statements (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Milisav Vukovic, charged with one count of false statements (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Nedjo Lojpur, indicted on two counts of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Ratko Maslenjak, charged with one count of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Dalibor Butina, charged with one count of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Radovan Jankovic, charged with one count of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Vlado Kecojevic, charged with one count of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Branislav Cancar, charged with one count of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Mladen Blagojevic, charged with fraud or misuse of visas, permits, and other documents (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Nenad Dragic, charged with fraud or misuse of visas, permits, and other documents; and perjury (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Milenko Gujic, charged with fraud or misuse of visas, permits, and other documents (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Mitra Gujic, charged with fraud or misuse of visas, permits, and other documents (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Rajko Hercegovac, charged with fraud or misuse of visas, permits, and other documents (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Risto Hercegovac, charged with fraud or misuse of visas, permits, and other documents (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Momcilo Krstic, charged with fraud or misuse of visas, permits, and other documents; and perjury (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Rajko Ninkovic, charged with fraud or misuse of visas, permits, and other documents (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Radenko Spiric, charged with fraud or misuse of visas, permits, and other documents; and perjury (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Vitomir Spiric, charged with fraud or misuse of visas, permits, and other documents; and perjury (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Nikola Stankovic, charged with fraud or misuse of visas, permits, and other documents (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Savo Tojcic, charged with fraud or misuse of visas, permits, and other documents; and perjury (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Cvijan Vidakovic, charged with fraud or misuse of visas, permits, and other documents; and perjury (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Marko Boskic, charged with two counds of immigration document fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Ugljesa Pantic, one count of possessing a green card obtained by making a false statement (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Zdravko Bozic, one count of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Radenko Ubiparipovic, one count of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Dragon Ubiparipovic, one count of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Goran Bencun, one count of immigration fraud (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Milenko Stjepanovic, one count of immigration visa fraud charge (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Mirka Stjepanovic, one count of immigration visa fraud charge (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Ranko Nastic, one count of immigration visa fraud charge (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).

Branko Ristic, one count of immigration visa fraud charge (in connection with concealing prior service in the Bosnian Serb military who participated in Srebrenica genocide, Srebrenica massacre).


Sources and related readings:
1. Sixteen charged with concealing Bosnian Serb military when entering U.S. – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (December 15, 2006)
2. Former member of brutal Bosnian Serb military unit sentenced to jail for concealing his military past – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (November 20, 2006)
3. ICE probe leads to indictement of four former members of Bosnian Serb military for immigration fraud – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (June 8 2006)
4. Thirteen past members of Serbian military indicted for immigration fraud – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (September 14, 2005)
5. Four Serb suspects arrested in Chicago
6. Four Serbs on trial for Srebrenica genocide; Two of them deported from the U.S.
7. Butchers of Srebrenica hiding in the U.S.
8. The United States deports two Serbs wanted for Srebrenica massacre
9. Bosnian Serb immigrants failed to disclose their past service in Genocidal military
10. Marko Boskic – Srebrenica murderer
11. Butcher of Srebrenica wants his own admission kept silent
12. Srebrenica massacre gunmen will not face torture charges
13. Elusive Justice: a man who gunned down 1,200 Srebrenica Bosniaks
14. Phoenix, Arizona: Mecca for Serb suspects of Srebrenica genocide

MORE SERB SUSPECTS ARRESTED IN THE UNITED STATES

June 26, 2007 Comments off

FOUR SERB SUSPECTS ARRESTED IN CHICAGO

ICE encourages the public to provide any information they may have regarding Srebrenica genocide suspects living in the United States. Nationwide, anonymous tips about Srebrenica massacre suspects may be reported at 1-866-DHS-2ICE (toll-free line: 1-866-347-2423).

Four Bosnian Serb men residing in local suburbs of Chicago were arrested by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents Tuesday for concealing their prior service in the Bosnian-Serb military so they could enter the United States as refugees. All four failed to disclose on their immigration applications that they had served in the Bosnian Serb military which was involved in the genocide of 8,000 Bosniaks in Srebrenica in 1995.

The four men arrested include: Dalibor Butina, 33; Radovan Jankovic, 61; Vlado Kecojevic, 53; all of Loves Park; and Branislaw Cancar, 47, of Schiller Park. ICE agents arrested the men on immigration charges for fraudulently entering the U.S. as refugees between 1997 and 2004. The four Bosnian Serb men committed immigration fraud by concealing their prior service in these Bosnian-Serb military units when filing immigration applications with the U.S. government. The fraudulent applications enabled the individuals to gain refugee status, which allowed them to enter and reside in the United States.

After entering the United States and receiving refugee status, all four subsequently applied for and received U.S. permanent residence. They have been placed in deportation proceedings. They will be scheduled for hearings before a federal immigration judge who will make the final determination in their cases.

“A top priority of Immigration and Customs Enforcement is to ensure that our nation’s immigration system is not exploited by those who wish to illegally gain refuge in the United States,” said Elissa A. Brown, special agent-in-charge of the ICE Office of Investigations in Chicago. “We focus our efforts on those individuals who enter this country under false pretenses, especially those who hide their military past.” Brown oversees a six-state area which includes: Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri and Wisconsin.

Identifying and removing persecutors and human rights violators from the United States is one of ICE’s top enforcement programs. To achieve this goal, ICE created its Human Rights Violators Unit, with a specific mandate to deny safe haven to human rights violators by bringing to bear a full range of investigative techniques and legal authorities to identify, locate, investigate and remove them from the United States. ICE has currently identified more than 800 cases from 85 countries involving suspected human rights violators.

In-depth research about Srebrenica genocide suspects hiding in the US:

USE OF CHEMICAL WEAPONS REQUESTED BY TOLIMIR

June 4, 2007 Comments off
Short Intro: With the capture of Zdravko Tolimir – the third most wanted Srebrenica genocide suspect, who requested chemical weapon strikes against the refugees of the U.N. protected enclave of Zepa – we can only hope that his trial will shed more light on previously “inconclusive” findings as to whether or not chemical weapons were used against the people fleeing the U.N. protected enclaves during Srebrenica genocide. According to the eye witness testimonies of survivors these agents had been used against them, and according to the material evidence provided by the International Crimes Tribunal, Gen Zdravko Tolimir did in fact request chemical strikes against refugee columns…

Serb nationalists chant slogans glorifying Ratko Mladic, the former Bosnian Serb commander wanted on genocide charges by a U.N. court, during a rally in Belgrade, Serbia. Many Serbs still view genocide fugitives as heroes of mythical proportions.

Key Srebrenica Massacre Suspect Transferred To UN Tribunal (includes Blog Editors’ Analysis about “Chemical Tolimir”)

By Stefan Bos

The relatives of victims of Europe’s worst massacre since World War II have welcomed the arrest of a key suspect in the atrocity. Bosnian Serb General Zdravko Tolimir was detained Thursday and flown to the United Nations War Crimes Tribunal in The Hague on charges related to the killings of up to 8,000 Muslims in the Bosnian town of Srebrenica during the Balkan wars of the 1990s. Under tight security, Bosnian Serb General Zdravko Tolimir left Bosnia Herzegovina for the Netherlands-based UN Tribunal to face charges of genocide. Tolimir, 58, was a senior aide to the Bosnian Serbs’ wartime military commander General Ratko Mladic when the 1995 slaughter took place. The slaughter is marked by the United Nations as one of the worse cases of “ethnic cleansing” during the Balkan wars of the 1990s.

Bosnian and Serbian security forces arrested Tolimir late Thursday as he tried to enter Serbia from Bosnia. He was later handed over to U.N, authorities in Banja Luka. Tolimir was considered the third most wanted war crimes suspect in the Balkans after General Ratko Mladic, former Bosnian Serb Army chief, and Radovan Karadzic, former Bosnian Serb President.

In comments aired on Reuters television and other networks, relatives of those who died reacted with mixed emotions to the news of his arrest.

“This is good news for the victims, but it should have happened 12 years ago,” said Munira Subasic, a representative of the Association of Women from Srebrenica.

“I hope that [Radovan] Karadzic and [Ratko] Mladic will come out from their hideouts as well to face justice,” added Kada Horic, who survived the Srebrenica massacre.

Olga Kavran, the spokeswoman of the United Nations Chief Prosecutor Carla Del Ponte, shares that view. Kavran told reporters she hopes that Serbia will step up efforts to extradite war crimes suspects.

“There are still five remaining [top] fugitives, most of whom we believe to be within reach of Serbia,” she said. “Serbia is in violation of many international obligations by not delivering namely Ratko Mladic, Radovan Karadzic and the other fugitives, and that does not change.”

U.N. officials hope that Tolimir could provide key information about Mladic and Karadzic. Tolimir is thought by experts to have helped commander Mladic evade arrest since his indictment for war crimes in 1995. The European Union has urged Serbia to transfer more war crimes suspects. EU Enlargement Commissioner, Olli Rehn, made clear Friday that the arrest of Tolimir would pave the way to resume stalled talks with the Serbian government about establishing closer ties.

BLOG EDITOR’S ANALYSIS (CHEMICAL WEAPONS): Those who survived Srebrenica genocide and vicious attacks against them “…described mortar shells that produced a strange smoke, one that spread out slowly.” Survivors testified that some people then began to hallucinate and act irrationally, killing themselves or their friends. Human Rights Watch believed the chemical used was B-Z, a non-lethal agent that incapacitates people. It is a chemical the army of the former Yugoslavia possessed.” (Source: Federation of American Scientists) The evidence remained “inconclusive” due to inability of Human Rights Watch to properly test the samples and, in our opinion, due to some “leftist” circles within HRW who seemed to accept eyewitness testimonies with mean-spirited scepticism (Just take a “wording” of this HRW 1998 report, it seemed as it had been written by a leftist-apologist Srebrenica massacre denier who was trying to mask his scepticism with few objective statements even stating that the allegations might be “false.” Imagine questioning testimonies of Holocaust victims in this “sceptic” way and even suggesting they are “false”?) However, HRW quickly corrected itself by stating few objective conclussions worth noting from this “inconclusive” report:

“…it is likely that if a chemical agent was used during the trek from Srebrenica to Tuzla, the people most affected by it are no longer alive to tell their story, having been killed by Serb forces following their incapacitation by BZ or a similar substance. Secondly, Human Rights Watch did not have the resources to do systematic sampling for BZ or a BZ-like compound. Moreover, Human Rights Watch has also not been able to obtain other types of evidence that have been said to exist, including transcripts of Serb radio transmissions from the time of the Srebrenica events…. The United States government apparently took the allegations seriously enough to conduct an investigation, reported to have taken place in late 1996 or early 1997. The results of this investigation have not been made public, but in late 1996 or early 1997 the U.S. intelligence community had information suggesting that chemical weapons may have been used in Srebrenica. The government’s refusal to release the findings may, according to a U.S. official interviewed by Human Rights Watch, be based on a belief that making this information public might hurt the international effort to effect peace in the former Yugoslavia.”

In 1995, a team of the U.S. Defense Department experts interviewed a number of Srebrenica survivors in the summer of 1996, and concluded that their accounts supported allegations of the use of chemical incapacitants. The conclusion was deemed highly significant by the department. This information was sent up the chain of command. In late 1996, the U.S. intelligence community had information that chemical weapons may have been used in Srebrenica. A large investigation, which included physical sampling, was undertaken in late 1996 or early 1997 by the U.S. Government. The results of this investigation are not known to us.

One official told Human Rights Watch in December 1996 that ”we do not see an advantage in declassifying those documents relating to chemical weapons use in Bosnia. We have spoken with people and received assurances that other channels are being pursued that we believe would be more effective and achieve a more favorable outcome than simply publicizing theme.” That is where it’s been left. (Source: The 1998 U.S. Congressional Hearing on Srebrenica Genocide)

(Photo of Peter McCloskey)
In 2006 opening statements, the U.N. Prosecutor McCloskey stated that “criminal orders in war are as a rule issued verbally”, and that a few exceptions existed to the rule. One of the most striking ones is a report sent on 21 July 1995 by General Zdravko Tolimir from Zepa to General Radomir Miletic, acting Chief of General Staff of the VRS. Tolimir is asking for help to crush some BH Army strongholds, expressing his view that “the best way to do it would be to use chemical weapons”. In the same report, Chemical Tolimir goes even further,proposing strikes against refugee columns leaving Zepa, because that would “force the Muslim fighters to surrender quickly”, in his opinion. (Source: SENSE Tribunal, 2006.)

The total Yugoslav chemical weapons arsenal contained sarin, mustard gas, BZ, and the tear gases CN and CS (all in large quantities), together with quite traditional products such as phosgene, chlorine picric acid, cyanogen chloride, adamsite, lewisite, and other materials, often only in laboratory quantities. (Source: Federation of American Scientists)

Key Srebrenica Massacre Suspect Transferred To UN Tribunal – republished from VOA News for Fair Use Only [Educational / Non-Commercial purposes].

FOUR ON TRIAL OF WHICH TWO DEPORTED FROM THE US

April 24, 2007 3 comments
FOUR SERBS ON TRIAL FOR SREBRENICA MASSACRE, TWO OF THEM DEPORTED FROM THE UNITED STATES

Four Bosnian Serbs went on trial on Friday at Bosnia’s war crimes court for crimes committed during the 1995 Srebrenica massacre of up to 8,000 Bosniaks.

A forensic expert works in a mass grave in the village of Budak just outside Srebrenica in 2005Two of the suspects, former military policemen Zdravko Bozic and Mladen Blagojevic, were deported to Bosnia last June and November for lying to U.S. immigration authorities about their service in the Bosnian Serb military during the 1992-95 war.

Together with Zeljko Zaric and Zoran Zivanovic, who were arrested in Bosnia last December, they were charged with the detention, murder and forcible transfer of Bosniaks after Serb forces overran the U.N. “safe area” of Srebrenica.

“According to the prosecution, the four took part in the illegal military operation in the safe area of Srebrenica in July 1995,” Bosnian radio reported Prosecutor Kwao Hong Ip as telling the court.

“They are also responsible for not preventing the crime or protecting the civilians,” he said.

According to the indictment the accused confined 2,000 to 3,000 unarmed Muslim civilians in a primary school in Bratunac near Srebrenica and participated in the abuse, beatings and cruel treatment of the detainees.

It also said that Bozic and Blagojevic together with six other members of the Serb army executed at least 5 Bosniaks while Zaric and Zivanovic separated three Bosniaks from other detainees and killed them by firing from automatic firearms.

In December, the U.S. authorities arrested 26 Bosnian Serbs and accused a number of them of taking part in Europe’s worst single atrocity since World War Two.

Over 8,000 Bosniaks from Srebrenica and surrounding villages were killed in July 1995. The bodies of about half have been found in more than 80 mass graves in the Srebrenica area and the rest are awaiting DNA identification which could take years to complete.

Bosnian Serb wartime leader Radovan Karadzic and military chief Ratko Mladic have been indicted by the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague over Srebrenica and the 43-month siege of Sarajevo.

Both men are still at large. Karadzic is believed to be hiding in eastern Bosnia or Montenegro and Mladic in Serbia.

Another 11 Bosnian Serbs are on trial for Srebrenica genocide at the Bosnian war crimes court while about two dozen are either being tried or have been convicted by the U.N. war crimes court and courts in Serbia and Croatia.

In-depth research about Srebrenica genocide suspects hiding in the US:

1. Phoenix, Arizona – A Mecca for Serb Suspects of Srebrenica Massacre
2. The United States Deports Two Serbs Wanted for Srebrenica Massacre
3. Bosnian Serb Immigrants Failed to Disclose Their Past Service in Genocidal Military
4. Marko Boskic – Srebrenica Murderer
5. Butcher of Srebrenica Wants His Own Admission Kept Silent
6. Srebrenica Massacre Gunman, Marko Boskic, Will Not Face Torture Charges
7. Elusive Justice: A Man Who Gunned Down 1,200 Srebrenica Bosniaks

LIST OF SREBRENICA GENOCIDE SUSPECTS

August 31, 2006 5 comments

NAMES OF SREBRENICA MASSACRE PERPETRATORS WHO ARE STILL IN POSITION OF POWER

NOTE: Srebrenica Genocide Blog will keep updating the list as names continue to be released by Sarajevo-based Oslobodjenje Daily.

The Bosnian daily newspaper Oslobodjenje has started publishing a list of over 800 Bosnian Serbs who allegedly participated in the Srebrenica massacre in July 1995, and are still believed to be in positions of power.

These names are just a small part of a much bigger list of some 28,000 people who, according to the Republika Srpska [Serb Entity in Bosnia], RS, authorities, were directly or indirectly involved in the massacre. Out of 28,000 names that the full version of the report apparently contains, 892 are reported to be individuals still employed by governmental and municipal institutions.

Back in October 2004, the RS Srebrenica Commission, under pressure from the international community, released a report in which they acknowledged that Serbs had been responsible for killing thousands of Bosniak men and boys from Srebrenica in July 1995.

First Part – 69 names, published on 08/24/06

Goran (Rajko) Abazović, Neško (Vladimir) Aćimović, Dušan (Drago) Aćimović, Milan (Vladimir) Aćimović, Zoran (Petko) Aćimović, Mile (Miladin) Aćimović, Siniša (Milan) Aleksić, Aleksa (Predrag) Aleksić, Draško (Božo) Aleksić, Milenko (Dragoljub) Aleksić, Brano (Dušan) Aleksić, Marko (Vladimir) Aleksić, Dragomir (Risto) Alempić, Rajko (Ljubinko) Alempić, Žarko (Vlajko) Andrić, Drago (Ljubo) Andrić, Mirjana (Stojan) Andrić, Nenad (Žarko) Andrić, Milan (Đorđo) Ašćerić, Radislav (Diko) Ašćerić, Dragomir (Božidar) Ašćerić, Vojslav (Ljubomir) Ašćerić, Mirko (Savo) Ašćerić, Dragan (Stevo) Ašćerić, Dragomir (Petar) Ašonja, Sveto (Rajko) Avramović, Miroslav (Jovo) Babić, Goran (Ilija) Bačić, Perica (Dragan) Bajević, Momir (Stojan) Bakmaz, Miroslav (Branko) Baljak, Novka (Petar) Banjac, Risto (Gojko) Barač, Ranko (Rajko) Baračanin, Dana (Branko) Bartula, Rade (Anđelko) Bašić, Miroslav (Mirko) Batovac, Ljubiša (Kosta) Bećarević, Siniša (Vladimir) Bećarević, Bogoljub (Bogdan) Begović, Goran (Cvijetin) Bencun, Milo (Božo) Bjelić, Marko (Risto) Blagojević, Ranko (Milivoje) Blagojević, Radenko (Neđo) Blagojević, Dušan (Slobodan) Blagojević, Gordana (Milan) Blažanović, Mila (Luka) Bodirogić, Milan (Anđelka) Bogdanović, Luka (Miladin) Bogdanović, Radovan (Mitar) Bojanić, Sredoje (Velizar) Bojić, Slobodan (Ljubo) Bojić, Milenko (Mijat) Borić, Radenko (Radosava) Borić, Darko (Vojislava) Borovčanin, Danko (Rade) Borovčanin, Radoslav (Milovan) Bošković, Todor (Boško) Bošković, Željko (Risto) Bošnjak, Obren (Dušan) Božić, Radoslav (Neđo) Božić, Kirilo (Mitar) Božić, čedo (Blagoje) Božić, Goran (Petar) Božičković, Borislav (Ratko) Božović, Stevo (Rado) Bunijevac, Boro (Marko) Bunjevac, Mile (Novo) Burilo.

Second Part: – 59 names, published on 08/25/06

Simo (Petar) Čabrić, Diko (Radivoje) Čabrić, Dragan (Nikola) Čabrić, Mario (Jozo) Cakalin, Radenko (Nenad) Čakarević, Vjekoslav (Veljko) Čakarević, Aleksa (Milentije) Čanić, Mladen (Bogoljub) Čavić, Predrag (Miodrag) Čelić, Rado (Krsto) Čelić, Ljubiša (Ranko) Čelić, Novica (Petar) Čelić, Petko (Milan) Cinco, Luka (Božo) Cinco, Milenko (Zdravko) Ćirković, Dragan (Branislav) Čobić, Marko (Dragiša) Čojić, Siniša (Šćepana) Čorić, Nemanja (Nedeljko) Crnjak, Rajko (Aleksa) Čuturić, Nada (Aleksa) Cvijan, Miljan (Borislav) Cijetić, Miroslav (Bogoljub) Cvijetić, Ristan (Čedo) Cvijetinović, Branislav (Matija) Čvorić, Radoš (Bojo) Čvoro, Todor (Milorad) Damnjanović, Stojan (Damjan) Danilović, Branislav (Boško) Danilović, Slaviša (Janko) Danojević, Vitomir (Rade) Deležan, Goran (Bogdan) Delmić, Milisav (Milan) Dendić, Milomir (Aćim) Đerić, Nenad (Spasoje) Deronjić, Boško (Miloš) Dešić, Nikola (Stjepan) Deurić, Goran (Zoran) Deurić, Momir (Lazo) Deurić, Milimir (Vojin) Divčić, Božidar (Drago) Đokić, Mirjana (Radoslav) Đokić, Slaviša (Dobrisav) Đokić, Savo (Sretko) Domazetović, Vitomir (Slobodan) Draganić, Miladin (Mitar) Dragić, Relja (Rajko) Dragić, Radomir (Branislav) Dragutinović, Zoran (Milan) Drakulić, Zoran (Ljuban) Drakulić, Ranko (Đorđo) Drašković, Marinko (Dražo) Dražić, Željko (Slobodan) Drljača, Dragiša (Mihajlo) Drljić, Pavle (Dragan) Dubov, Ljubiša (Cvijo) Đurić, Siniša (Mirko) Duković, Radinko (Mirko) Duković, Timo (Ratko) Dukić.

Third Part – 100 names, published on 09/05/2006

Tomislav (Milorad) Dukić, Rajko (Ratko) Dukić, Aleksandar (Vaso) Dukić, Zoran (Dejan) Durmić, Mile (Arsena) Đukić, Dragan (Milorad) Đukić, Brano (Milan) Đurđević, Miladin (Trivko) Đurić, Bogoljub (Gojko) Đurić, Dragan (Nikola) Đurić, Miloš (Nikola) Đurić, Boro (Veljko) Đurić, Srđan (Dušan) Đurić, Rajko (Slavko) Đurić, Milenko (Dušan) Đuričić, Aleksandar (Petar) Đurčić, Zoran (Mladen) Džabić, Nikola (Branko) Džebić, Brano (Ratomir) Džinić, Ratomir (Vukašin) Džinkić, Slaviša (Radivoje) Džuović, Veselin (Neđo) Erdelić, Ljuban (Milan) Erdelić, Radiša (Svetozar) Erić, Miroslav (Petko) Erić, Sreten (Tripun) Erić, Milenko (Todor) Erić, Cvjetko (Risto) Erić, Marinko (Mitar) Erić, Mirko (Miloš) Erkić, Dražan (Petar) Erkić, Nenad (Uroš) Filipović, Radiša (Simo) Filipović, Milomir (Danilo) Furtula, Aleksandar (Nikola) Gačanin, Veljko (Ilija) Gajić, Zoran (Milan) Gajić, Željko (Ilija) Gajić, Vlado (Čedo) Gajić, Ljubomir (Vukašin) Gajić, Milan (Mićo) Gajić, Goran (Branislav) Garić, Vojislav (Ilija) Gašanović, Mirko (Drago) Gašević, Miroslav (Miloš) Gatarić, Mladen (Stanko) Gavrić, Mikajlo (Bogdan) Gavrić, Ranko (Danilo) Gavrilović, Vida (Velimir) Glamočić, Miladin (Anđelko) Gligić, Milka (Petar) Gligorić, Siniša (Savo) Glogovac, Pero (Bogdan) Gluvak, Luka (Milutin) Gojgolović, Zoran (Đorđe) Gojković, Božica (Ilija) Golić, Dragan (Rajko) Golić, Ljepomir (Milan) Golić, Boško (Nikola) Golijanin, Goran (Ranko) Gostić, Miladin (Vid) Gostimirović, Ljubinko (Vid) Gostimirović, Slaviša (Milovan) Grahovac, Mirko (Bogoljub) Grujić, Slavoljub (Slavko) Gužvić, Dragan (Borislav) Hajduković, Dragan (Milojko) Ignjić, Dragan (Dragomir) Ikonić, Vidoje (Branko) Ilić, Mladen (Momir) Ilić, Ivo (Dušan) Ilić, Rajko (Pantelije) Ilić, Jovan (Savo) Ilić, Dragan (Desimir) Ilić, Stevo (Dušan) Ilić, Zoran (Živko) Ilić, Milenija (Miloš) Ilić, Cvijeta (Mihajlo) Ilić, Mladen (Lazo) Iličić, Dragan (Desimir) Iljić, Risto (Gojko) Ivanović, Milenko (Radenko) Ivanović, Željko (Gojko) Ivanović, Diko (Milenko) Ivanović, Đorđe (Risto) Ivanović, Radivoje (Dragoslav) Ivanović, Goran (Sreten) Ivanović, Nedeljko (Tomo) Jaćimović, Krsto (Boško) Jakšić, Zoran (Ljubisav) Janjić, Milorad (Radislav) Janjić, Nenad (Petar) Janjić, Lenka (Jovan) Janjušić, Jovo (Marijan) Janković, Boro (Dragomir) Jelić, Zoran (Zdravko) Jeličić, Slaviša (Radovan) Jelisić, Nebojša (Slobodan) Jeremić, Mile (Veselin) Jerkić.

SREBRENICA MASSACRE BUTCHERS STILL ADMIRED IN SERBIA

June 15, 2006 1 comment
PEOPLE RESPONSIBLE FOR SLAUGHTER OF OVER 8,000 BOSNIAKS IN SREBRENICA STILL REGARDED AS ‘HEROES’ IN SERBIA

BELGRADE, Serbia – The general still has his admirers.

Serb General Ratko Mladic is directly responsible for Srebrenica Massacre in which over 8,000 Bosniak men and boys perished and in which over 25,000 Bosniak women were forcibly deported, many of them raped and degraded - all under United Nation's watchIn the musty headquarters of the Center for the Investigation of War Crimes Against Serbs in Bosnia-Herzegovina, his portrait is prominently displayed on the wall behind Ljubisa Ristic’s desk. There were about 2,000 Serb civilian casualties in the war which Serbia waged against Bosnia-Herzegovina between 1992 and 1995 [sourceas of Dec 15, 2005 data].

“My personal opinion is that he is a true soldier and a hero of the Serbian people,” Ristic said.

It is not clear how many other Serbs feel that way about Gen. Ratko Mladic, the wartime commander of the Bosnian Serb army and chief executor of its ethnic cleansing campaign.

“I’d say 75 percent of the Serbs see him as a war hero,” said Aleksandar Tijanic, who heads the state-run television network in Serbia. “But if you ask them if he should he go to The Hague to save the Serbs from more suffering, 75 percent would say yes.”

Mladic, who has been charged with genocide by the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague, has been on the run since the collapse of Yugoslav leader Slobodan Milosevic’s regime in October 2000.

Last month, the European Union broke off talks with Belgrade aimed at preparing Serbia for EU membership after President Vojislav Kostunica’s government missed another deadline for delivering Mladic. The United States followed suit this month, canceling a $7 million aid package to the Serbian government.

Carla Del Ponte, the tribunal’s chief prosecutor, has claimed repeatedly that Mladic is in Serbia and within the reach of Belgrade authorities. She says the government simply lacks the political will to arrest him.

That appeared to be the case in February when there were feverish media reports that the general had been cornered at a hiding place near the Bosnian border.

“But instead of arresting him, they started negotiating with him,” said Bratislav Grubacic, a political analyst who publishes a widely respected newsletter.

The negotiations came to nothing. “And now they really don’t know where he is,” Grubacic said. “For this government, I think they prefer not to know.”

Vladan Batic, the former Yugoslav justice minister who ordered the extradition of Milosevic to The Hague in June 2001, agrees with Del Ponte that the present government lacks the political will to deliver Mladic.

“Kostunica was hoping that Mladic would surrender himself,” said Batic. “He knows Mladic is our ticket to Europe, but he’s afraid that if he gives up Mladic, he’ll lose a lot of votes and won’t be seen as a so-called patriot.” Batic, who heads a small opposition party and who retains good police and security contacts, believes Mladic is holed up at the Topcider military base, a large complex amid a forest outside Belgrade that has an elaborate network of tunnels.

State TV boss Tijanic, who is close to Kostunica, disputes the Topcider theory and also the suggestion that Kostunica is afraid of arresting Mladic.

“Today, Kostunica’s government is willing to send him to The Hague, but they don’t know where he is hiding,” Tijanic said.

Citing the recent arrests of about a dozen people thought to be part of Mladic’s support system, Tijanic claimed that Mladic has cut all of his contacts with the military and security forces and is hiding on his own.

The international community’s focus on Mladic has diverted attention from Radovan Karadzic, the Bosnian Serb wartime political leader, also charged with genocide and still on the run.


There are three explanations.

The first is The Hague’s experience in prosecuting genocide cases, which argues that it is much easier to obtain a conviction against military officers, who answer to a clear chain of command, than it is against their political bosses. A second explanation is that Karadzic, who is believed to be in Bosnia, has done a better job hiding himself.

The last, based on a persistent rumor echoed by nearly every diplomat and expert in the Balkans, is that at the time of the Dayton peace agreement, Karadzic cut a deal that he would completely withdraw from politics if authorities would not try too hard to find him. Little has been heard from him since.

A year ago, public opinion in Serbia was shaken by a video recording that came to light during the Milosevic trial. It shows members of an Interior Ministry death squad known as the Scorpions executing six handcuffed Bosniak men and boys from Srebrenica, where more than 8,000 Bosniak men and boys were massacred in 1995, allegedly on orders from Mladic.

The video [source], shot by one of the participants, was shown on Serbian television and the government, for the first time, acknowledged that Serbs were guilty of atrocities. The killers, who were identifiable on the video, have been arrested and are being tried in Serbian courts.

Ristic, from the center for war crimes against Serbs, said the trials were appropriate, but insisted that the Scorpion tape has not shaken his faith in Mladic’s innocence.

“I was not there (Srebrenica), so I can’t tell you whether he ordered anything or not. But after our clear-cut victory, it was not in Serbia’s interest to do something like that,” he said.

Milan Protic, a historian who served as Yugoslavia’s first ambassador to the United States in the post-Milosevic era, said that only “stupid minds” in Serbia continued to view Mladic as a hero, but that it also is wrong for the EU and the United States to hold all of Serbia hostage to his arrest.

“He is an obsolete symbol, this dirty little Serbian commander from Bosnia,” he said, “but the West is using him to complicate all kinds of things for Serbia.

BOSNIA OPENS SREBRENICA GENOCIDE TRIAL

May 10, 2006 Comments off

Bosnia war crimes court opens first genocide trial

SARAJEVO – Bosnia’s war crimes court on Tuesday launched the trial of 11 Bosnian Serbs charged over the 1995 Srebrenica massacre of 8,000 Bosniaks, its first genocide trial since it opened last year.
The former army officers and special policemen are accused of killing over 1,000 Bosniak men aged between 16 and 60 while they were trying to escape the eastern United Nations-protected enclave on July 13, 1995.
Prosecutor Ibro Bulic said 8 of the men fired their machine guns at the prisoners, one threw hand grenades at them and another reloaded the ammunition.
The victims were first buried in a nearby mass grave and transferred to Glogova and Zeleni Jadar mass grave sites two weeks later in order to hide the crime, Bulic said. Some bodies were found after the 1992-95 war.
“The prosecution will ask the court to declare these men guilty so that a small step towards meeting justice can be made,” Bulic said in his introductory remarks.
Milenko Trifunovic, one of the men accused of firing his machine gun, and Milos Stupar, commanders of two special police squads engaged in the operation, were charged with individual criminal responsibility for failing to intervene and protect the prisoners.
The 11 accused were arrested last year and all have pleaded not guilty to the charges.Their indictment brings to 36 the number of those charged for the Srebrenica massacre, Europe’s worst atrocity since World War Two.
The U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague has also charged 19 people for the massacre. Six have been convicted and nine are on trial or awaiting trial.
The masterminds, Bosnian Serb wartime leader Radovan Karadzic and his military commander Ratko Mladic, remain at large nearly 11 years after being indicted.

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