Archive

Posts Tagged ‘srebrenica massacre anniversary’

534 VICTIMS OF GENOCIDE LAID TO REST, 14TH ANNIVERSARY PHOTOS

July 11, 2009 Comments off
Fourteen years after the Europe’s worst massacre since World War II, 534 DNA-identified victims of the Srebrenica genocide are finally laid to rest (names of victims). May their souls rest in peace. We will never forget.

HOW IT ALL STARTED? Serbs from heavily militarized villages around Srebrenica had terrorized Srebrenica population and constantly attacked neighbouring Bosnian Muslim villages from 1992-1995. In July 1995 the Bosnian Serb army staged a brutal takeover of Srebrenica and its surrounding area, where they proceeded to perpetrate genocide. Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves. Here are some of the photos from the 14th anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide:

[ click on photos for full size / higher resolution ]

US ambassador to Bosnia Charles English, left, and US congressman Russ Carnahan, right, (D-Mo) pay their respects near a marble stone with the sign Srebrenica July 1995 during funeral ceremony at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial center of Potocari near Srebrenica, 120 kms northeast of Sarajevo on Saturday, July 11, 2009. Tens of thousands of relatives and survivors gathered in Srebrenica to mark the 14th anniversary of Europe’s worst massacre since World War II and to bury 534 victims recently recovered from mass graves. Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

Zeljko Komsic, the Croat chairman of Bosnia’s collective presidency, lays a wreath during the funeral for 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre in Potocari July 11, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide of more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

Kada Jusic, a Bosnian Muslim woman, mourns between the graves of her son and husband during the funeral of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre in Potocari July 11, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

Bosnian women sit at the former Dutch U.N. peacekeepers base, in front of offensive graffiti left by Dutch soldiers as they handed Srebrenica to genocidal forces of Bosnian Serb commander Ratko Mladic (see photos of Dutch graffiti). Women wait for the funeral of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre in Potocari July 11, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide of more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces.

Bosnian Muslims pray behind coffins of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica genocide during their funeral in Potocari July 11, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

Bosnian Muslims carry the coffins of some of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre during their funeral in Potocari July 11, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide of more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

Relatives carry one of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica genocide to his resting place during a mass funeral in Potocari July 11, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

A Bosnian Muslim woman leans on Memorial Wall at at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial Center in Potocari near Srebrenica during the burial on 11 July, 2009 of 534 newly identified victims on the 14th anniversary of the wartime massacre in the Bosnian town. The 534 victims were among more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and elderly who were killed by Serb forces after they captured the UN-protected enclave on July 11, 1995, and committed Europe’s worst massacre since World War II. The remains of the victims were in most cases found in secondary mass graves where they had been moved from initial burial sites in a bid by Serbs to cover up war crimes. Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

A Bosniak boy looks away while female family members pray near a freshly dug gravesite prepared for a relative during a burial ceremony at Srebrenica Genocide Memorial Center, on July 11, 2009. The 534 bodies, excavated from mass-graves in Eastern Bosnia, were among more than 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men, boys, and elderly who were killed by Serb forces after they captured the UN-protected enclave on July 11, 1995, and committed Europe’s worst atrocity since World War II. Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

A Bosnian Muslim woman and her daughter attend the burial of a relative at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial Center in Potocari near Srebrenica on 11 July, 2009 of 534 newly identified victims on the 14th anniversary of the wartime massacre in the Bosnian town. The 534 victims were among more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and elderly who were killed by Serb forces after they captured the UN-protected enclave on July 11, 1995, and committed Europe’s worst atrocity since World War II. The remains of the victims were in most cases found in secondary mass graves where they had been moved from initial burial sites in a bid by Serbs to cover up war crimes. Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

A Bosnian Muslim woman pays her respect by the gravesite of a relative during a burial ceremony at Srebrenica Genocide Memorial Center, on July 11, 2009. The 534 bodies, excavated from mass-graves in Eastern Bosnia, were among more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and elderly who were killed by Serb forces after they captured the UN-protected enclave on July 11, 1995, and committed Europe’s worst atrocity since World War II. Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

Bosnians protect themselves from the rain as they attend a funeral for 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre in Potocari July 11, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and the elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces.

Bosnian Muslim women weep beside coffins of Srebrenica genocide victims during a funeral ceremony at the Memorial center of Potocari near Srebrenica, 120 kms northeast of Sarajevo on Saturday, July 11, 2009. Tens of thousands of relatives and survivors gathered in Srebrenica to mark the 14th anniversary of Europe’s worst massacre since World War II and to bury 534 victims recently recovered from mass graves.

A Bosnian Muslim woman weeps among coffins of Srebrenica victims during a funeral ceremony at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial center in Potocari, July 11, 2009. Tens of thousands of relatives and survivors gathered in Srebrenica to mark the 14th anniversary of Europe’s worst genocide since World War II and to bury 534 victims recently recovered from mass graves.

A Bosnian Muslim woman mourns by the grave of her relative during the funeral of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica genocide in Potocari July 11, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces.

A Bosnian Muslim woman mourns by a grave prepared for her relative before the funeral of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica genocide in Potocari July 11, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide of more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces.

Bosnians stand over the names of victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre before a funeral for 534 newly identified Bosniak victims in Potocari July 11, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide of more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces.

Bosnians stand over the names of victims of the 1995 Srebrenica genocide before a funeral for 534 newly identified Bosniaks in Potocari July 11, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces.

SREBRENICA MASSACRE VICTIMS PREPARE FOR BURIAL (PHOTOS)

July 11, 2009 3 comments
BACKGROUND: Serbs from heavily militarized villages around Srebrenica had terrorized Srebrenica population and constantly attacked neighbouring Bosnian Muslim villages from 1992-1995. In July 1995 the Bosnian Serb army staged a brutal takeover of Srebrenica and its surrounding area, where they proceeded to perpetrate genocide. Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves. Here are some of the photos from preparations for the 14th anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide:

[click photos for higher resolution]

1. Coffins of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre are lined up for a joint burial in Potocari July 10, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men and boys by the Bosnian Serb forces. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

2. Bosnian Muslim people search for the remains of their relatives among coffins of Srebrenica massacre victims laid row upon row at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial center of Potocari near Srebrenica, 120 kms northeast of Sarajevo on Thursday, July 9, 2009. The remains of 534 victims were excavated from mass-graves in Eastern Bosnia and were identified as Bosniaks killed by Bosnian Serb forces in the Srebrenica area. Bosnian Serb troops massacred more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, children, and elderly after capturing Srebrenica on July 11, 1995, during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves. The 534 identified victims will be buried on July 11 in the Memorial Center Potocari, next to some 3,500 victims of the massacre already buried there.

3. Mustafa Ceric (L), the Grand Mufti of Bosnia’s Muslims, and other priests walk between coffins of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari July 10, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

4. A Bosnian Muslim woman comforts her son as he weeps over the coffin of his father, among coffins of Srebrenica massacre victims displayed at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial centre of Potocari near Srebrenica on July 10, 2009. The 534 bodies were excavated from mass-graves in Eastern Bosnia and were identified as Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims) killed by Bosnian Serb forces in the Srebrenica area. Bosnian Serb troops massacred more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, children, and elderly after capturing Srebrenica on July 11, 1995, during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves. The 534 identified victims will be buried on July 11 in the Potocari Memorial Center, next to some 3,500 victims of the massacre already buried there.

5. A Bosnian Muslim girl touches coffins of relatives, among coffins of Srebrenica victims displayed at the memorial centre of Potocari near Srebrenica on July 10, 2009. The 534 bodies were excavated from mass-graves in Eastern Bosnia and were identified as Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims) killed by Bosnian Serb forces in the Srebrenica area. Bosnian Serb troops massacred more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, boys, and elderly after capturing Srebrenica on July 11, 1995, during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves. The 534 identified victims will be buried on July 11 in the Potocari Memorial Center, next to some 3,500 victims of the massacre already buried there.

6. A Bosnian Muslim man cries by the coffin of his son, among 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari July 10, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, children, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

7. Bosnian Muslim woman Mejra Cekanovic weeps near coffin of her son among coffins of Srebrenica victims displayed at a memorial center of Potocari near Srebrenica, Bosnia, Friday, July 10, 2009. Serbian human rights groups on Friday urged authorities to declare July 11 a day of remembrance for the victims of the 1995 massacre in Srebrenica, Bosnia. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

8. Bosnian Muslim women weep near coffins of relatives among coffins of Srebrenica massacre victims displayed at a memorial center of Potocari near Srebrenica, Bosnia, Friday, July 10, 2009. Serbian human rights groups on Friday urged authorities to declare July 11 a day of remembrance for the victims of the 1995 massacre in Srebrenica, Bosnia. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

9. Muslim priests check names on coffins of some of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari July 10, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than to 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

10. Bosnian Muslim women comfort each other on July 9, 2009 as they look for the last time at trucks carrying coffins containing remains of their relatives as a convoy with 534 bodies is about to leave the morgue in central Bosnian town of Visoko, on its way to Srebrenica. The 534 bodies were excavated from mass graves in Eastern Bosnia and were identified as Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims) killed by Bosnian Serb forces in Srebrenica area during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The bodies of Srebrenica massacre victims are transported to memorial center in Potocari where they will be buried on 11 July, 2009, on 14th anniversary of the massacre. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

11. Bosnian Muslim women weep by the coffin of their relative among coffins of Srebrenica massacre victims displayed at the memorial centre of Potocari near Srebrenica on 10 July, 2009. The 534 bodies were excavated from mass-graves in Eastern Bosnia and were identified as Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims) killed by Bosnian Serb forces in the Srebrenica area. Bosnian Serb troops massacred more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, children, and elderly after capturing Srebrenica on 11 July, 1995, during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The 534 identified victims will be buried on July 11 in the Memorial Center Potocari, next to some 3,500 victims of the massacre already buried there. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

12. A girl prays with other Bosnian women as buses with coffins of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre pass Sarajevo on their way to a joint burial July 9, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

13. Bosnian Muslim woman react near trucks carrying the coffins of Srebrenica massacre victims, before a convoy with 534 bodies leaves the morgue in the central Bosnian town of Visoko, Thursday, July 9, 2009. The 534 bodies excavated from mass-graves in Eastern Bosnia were identified as Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims) killed by Bosnian Serb forces in the Srebrenica area during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The bodies will be transported to a memorial center in Potocari near Srebrenica where they will be buried on July 11, 2009, when the 14th anniversary of the massacre is to be marked. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

14. Bosnian women react as buses with coffins of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre pass Sarajevo on their way to a joint burial July 9, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, children, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

15. Bosnian Muslim women weeps by the coffin of her relative among coffins of Srebrenica victims displayed at the memorial centre of Potocari near Srebrenica on 10 July, 2009. The 534 bodies were excavated from mass-graves in Eastern Bosnia and were identified as Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims) killed by Bosnian-Serb forces in the Srebrenica area. Bosnian Serb troops massacred more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, children, and elderly after capturing Srebrenica on 11 July, 1995, during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves. The 534 identified victims will be buried on July 11 in the Memorial Center Potocari, next to some 3,500 victims of the massacre already buried there.

16. Bosnian Muslim women Ramiza Begic weeps near the coffin of her father among other coffins of Srebrenica massacre victims displayed at the memorial center of Potocari near Srebrenica, 120 kms northeast of Sarajevo on Thursday, July 9, 2009. The 534 bodies were excavated from mass-graves in Eastern Bosnia and were identified as Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims) killed by Bosnian Serb forces in the Srebrenica area. Bosnian Serb troops massacred more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men after capturing Srebrenica on July 11, 1995, during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves. The 534 identified victims will be buried on July 11 in the Memorial Center Potocari, next to some 3,500 victims of the massacre already buried there.

17. A Bosnian Muslim woman puts her hands on the bus with coffins of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre as they pass Sarajevo on their way to a joint burial July 9, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, children, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

18. A Bosnian-Muslim woman reacts by a truck loaded with coffins, including one of her relatives, before a convoy with 534 bodies leaves the morgue in the central Bosnian town of Visoko, Thursday, July 9, 2009. The 534 bodies excavated from mass-graves in Eastern Bosnia were identified as Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims) killed by Bosnian Serb forces in the Srebrenica area during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves. The bodies will be transported to a memorial center in Potocari near Srebrenica where they will be buried on July 11, 2009, when the 14th anniversary of the massacre is to be marked.

19. Bosnian Muslim women Fahreta Dudic weeps near coffin of her father among coffins of other Srebrenica victims displayed at the memorial center of Potocari near Srebrenica, 120 kms northeast of Sarajevo on Thursday, July 9, 2009. The 534 bodies were excavated from mass-graves in Eastern Bosnia and were identified as Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims) killed by Bosnian Serb forces in the Srebrenica area. Bosnian Serb troops massacred more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, boys, and elderly after capturing Srebrenica on July 11, 1995, during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves. The 534 identified victims will be buried on July 11 in the Memorial Center Potocari, next to some 3,500 victims of the massacre already buried there.

20. A Muslim cries beside the coffin of his son among 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari July 10, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

21. A Muslim woman prays beside the coffin of her relative among 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre lined up for a joint burial in Potocari July 10, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, boys, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

22. Bosnian Muslim women comfort each other near coffin of their relative among coffins of Srebrenica massacre victims displayed at a memorial center of Potocari near Srebrenica, Bosnia, Friday, July 10, 2009. Serbian human rights groups on Friday urged authorities to declare July 11 a day of remembrance for the victims of the 1995 massacre in Srebrenica, Bosnia. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

23. Muslim women walk between graves prepared for the funeral of 534 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre in Potocari July 11, 2009. Each year, bones are matched to a name and buried in a mass funeral on July 11, the anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of more than 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men, children, and elderly by the Bosnian Serb forces. Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

TENSIONS RISE IN KRAVICA VILLAGE NEAR SREBRENICA

July 10, 2009 1 comment

Reading time: 5-6 minutes

Just as they did last year, local Serbs are trying again to disrupt the anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide by threatening to prevent survivors and relatives of the genocide victims from visiting a massacre site of Bosniak civilians in Kravica village. Serbs are ‘angry’ because Bosniaks responded to Serb attacks by securing Kravica on Orthodox Christmas in 1993. From 1992-1995, Kravica was a heavily militarized Serb villlage from which Serbs constantly attacked neighboring Bosniak villages and the town of Srebrenica. Serbs never demilitarized around Srebrenica.

PHOTO: More than 1,000 Bosniak men, children, and elderly were taken to this warehouse in Kravica and killed by Serb paramilitaries during the 1995 Srebrenica genocide. Three years earlier – in 1992 – at least 927 Bosnian Muslims were slaughtered by Serbs from heavily militarized Serb villages around Srebrenica. To put things into perspective, from 1992 – 1995 at least 24,117 Bosniaks lost their lives in the Podrinje area.

WHAT ARE THE FACTS: The inhabitants of Serb village of Kravica participated in brutal attacks on Bosnian Muslim villages around Srebrenica and the town of Srebrenica in 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. Kravica was a heavily militarized Serb village used to launch artillery attacks on the neighbouring Bosniak villages, as well as to terrorize Bosnian Muslim population in the besieged enclave of Srebrenica.

Due to constant Serb attacks from heavily militarized Serb villages around Srebrenica, Bosniaks finally responded to Serb attacks by counter-attacking and securing Kravica on January 7, 1993 – Orthodox Christmas. Just a few days earlier, Serbs from Kravica launched brutal attacks on Srebrenica.

The Trial Judgment in Naser Oric case makes it clear that Serb villages around Srebrenica were heavily militarized bases from which Serbs launched brutal attacks on Bosnian Muslim villages, as well as on the town of Srebrenica itself. As stated in the Oric judgment, quote:
“Between April 1992 and March 1993, Srebrenica town and the villages in the area held by Bosnian Muslims were constantly subjected to Serb military assaults, including artillery attacks, sniper fire, as well as occasional bombing from aircrafts. Each onslaught followed a similar pattern. Serb soldiers and paramilitaries surrounded a Bosnian Muslim village or hamlet, called upon the population to surrender their weapons, and then began with indiscriminate shelling and shooting. In most cases, they then entered the village or hamlet, expelled or killed the population, who offered no significant resistance, and destroyed their homes. During this period, Srebrenica was subjected to indiscriminate shelling from all directions on a daily basis. Potočari in particular was a daily target for Serb artillery and infantry because it was a sensitive point in the defence line around Srebrenica. Other Bosnian Muslim settlements were routinely attacked as well. All this resulted in a great number of refugees and casualties.”

According to the Oric judgment, the Bosnian Muslim villages around Srebrenica were totally unprepared for war:
“In comparison, it appears that the Bosnian Muslim side did not adequately prepare for the looming armed conflict. There were not even firearms to be found in the BosnianMuslim villages, apart from some privately owned pistols and hunting rifles; a few light weaponswere kept at the Srebrenica police station.”

The Oric judgment makes it clear that Serb village of Kravica was a military base from which Serbs launched deadly attacks on neighbouring Bosnian Muslim villages and town of Srebrenica itself. The Bosniak counter-attack on Kravica on the 7 January 1993 followed as a result of Serb blockade of humanitarian aid and constant attacks on nearby Bosnian Muslim villages. According to the judgment:
“The fighting intensified in December 1992 and the beginning of January 1993, when Bosnian Muslims were attacked by Bosnian Serbs primarily from the direction of Kravica and Ježestica. In the early morning of the 7 January 1993, Orthodox Christmas day, Bosnian Muslims attacked Kravica, Ježestica and Šiljkovići. Convincing evidence suggests that the village guards were backed by the VRS [Bosnian Serb Army], and following the fighting in the summer of 1992, they Received military support, including weapons and training. A considerable amount of weapons and ammunition was kept in Kravica and Šiljkovići. Moreover, there is evidence that besides the village guards, there was Serb and Bosnian Serb military presence in the area. The Trial Chamber is not satisfied that it can be attributed solely to Bosnian Muslims. The evidence is unclear as to the number of houses destroyed by Bosnian Muslims as opposed to those destroyed by Bosnian Serbs. In light of this uncertainty, the Trial Chamber concludes that the destruction of property in Kravica between 7 and 8 December 1992 does not fulfil the elements of wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages not justified by military necessity.”

The Oric judgment also confirms that Bosniak refugees in the besieged enclave started dying from starvation caused by the Serb blockade of humanitarian aid. As a result, Bosniaks had to counter-attack Serb military bases around Srebrenica to obtain much needed food and other necessities for the survival:

“Between June 1992 and March 1993, Bosnian Muslims raided a number of vllages and hamlets inhabited by Bosnian Serbs, or from which Bosnian Muslims had formerly been expelled. One of the purposes of these actions was to acquire food, weapons, ammunition and military equipment. Bosnian Serb forces controlling the access roads were not allowing international humanitarian aid – most importantly, food and medicine – to reach Srebrenica. As a consequence, there was a constant and serious shortage of food causing starvation to peak in the winter of 1992/1993. Numerous people died or were in an extremely emaciated state due to malnutrition.”

NAMES OF VICTIMS SCHEDULED FOR BURIAL ON JULY 11 2009

July 10, 2009 Comments off
Here are the names of 534 DNA-identified Srebrenica genocide victims scheduled to be laid to rest at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial on July11, 2009 (Saturday) in Potocari. All victims have their names and a date of birth. May their souls finally rest in peace…

1 Abidović (Ferid) Fikret 1977 1 86 15
2 Abidović (Šaban) Rasim 1940 1 85 17
3 Ademović (Avdo) Sadik 1953 11 22 29
4 Ademović (Mustafa) Esed 1926 1 65 7
5 Ademović (Nurija) Avdo 1926 7 18 42
6 Ademović (Osman) Ibrahim 1937 5 18 24
7 Ahmetović (Abdulah) Merim 1973 12 18 9
8 Ahmetović (Avdulah) Zijad 1974 9 9 8
9 Ahmetović (Edhem) Bećir 1946 7 22 6
10 Ahmetović (Hašim) Ahmo 1936 3 10 7
11 Ahmetović (Osman) Munib 1976 11 4 35
12 Ahmetović (Ramo) Mujo 1927 3 23 22
13 Ahmetović (Ramo) Sulejman 1935 3 24 21
14 Alemić (Salkan) Hajrudin 1956 1 28 5
15 Alić (Abid) Meho 1931 3 33 10
16 Alić (Alija) Hakija 1941 1 12 9
17 Alić (Alija) Mahmut 1959 11 7 32
18 Alić (Hasan) Elvis 1976 10 14 8
19 Alić (Huso) Hasan 1953 10 14 9
20 Alić (Mehmed) Esed 1941 4 2 20
21 Alić (Mevludin) Mirsad 1974 10 18 10
22 Alić (Mujo) Šaćir 1960 1 23 3
23 Alić (Mustafa) Refik 1943 2 10 7
24 Alić (Nurif) Behajija 1952 10 16 12
25 Alić (Nurif) Mesud 1950 10 16 13
26 Alić (Suljo) Mustafa 1949 11 15 27
27 Alić (Šaćir) Mehrudin 1981 1 23 2
28 Alić (Šaćir) Šabo 1925 1 24 4
29 Alić (Zajko) Sado 1970 11 20 21
30 Aliefendić (Džemal) Bahrudin 1976 10 25 16
31 Alihodžić (Smail) Senid 1973 3 32 13
32 Alijašević (Meho) Izet 1940 11 11 37
33 Alispahić (Adil) Behadil 1979 10 22 13
34 Alispahić (Omer) Mujo 1965 3 27 5
35 Atić (Senahid) Sejad 1972 11 17 24
36 Avdić (Ćamil) Zijad 1969 10 21 10
37 Avdić (Daut) Said 1974 1 44 4
38 Avdić (Hamed) Muhamed 1974 6 11 1
39 Avdić (Husejin) Himzo 1941 10 19 1
40 Avdić (Junuz) Hamed 1951 6 10 1
41 Avdić (Junuz) Ramo 1957 6 10 2
42 Avdić (Mehmed) Vahid 1976 7 22 27
43 Avdić (Memiš) Omer 1940 4 12 1
44 Avdić (Mujo) Avdulah 1972 10 24 15
45 Avdić (Selim) Mustafa 1970 4 3 21
46 Bajraktarević (Salko) Alija 1960 10 21 17
47 Bajramović (Atif) Mujo 1969 7 21 32
48 Bašić (Hasan) Hasib 1959 9 6 8
49 Bećirović (Bahrija) Nezir 1948 10 21 12
50 Bećirović (Bajro) Abdulah 1952 7 18 33
51 Bećirović (Bećir) Ibrahim 1951 1 38 6
52 Bećirović (Ibiš) Ahmo 1922 12 17 10
53 Bećirović (Ismet) Sidik 1966 5 38 17
54 Bećirović (Kiram) Seid 1971 1 38 4
55 Beganović (Ahmet) Bajro 1953 12 21 9
56 Begić (Bego) Sabahudin 1972 8 6 17
57 Begić (Emin) Salih 1941 4 17 9
58 Begić (Kadrija) Ejub 1973 8 6 16
59 Begić (Mahmut) Bego 1949 8 6 18
60 Begić (Osman) Mujo 1944 9 14 21
61 Begić (Selman) Hajrudin 1937 4 16 1
62 Begić (Zildžija) Alija 1972 11 19 30
63 Begović (Hašim) Bavludin 1973 10 16 8
64 Begović (Hašim) Kasim 1976 10 16 7
65 Begzadić (Alija) Hajrudin 1954 10 19 10
66 Bekrić (Šaban) Vahid 1974 3 7 7
67 Bektić (Abid) Džemal 1960 11 11 48
68 Bektić (Bekto) Munib 1953 3 4 7
69 Bektić (Džemal) Esad 1958 9 6 6
70 Bektić (Huso) Suad 1967 10 15 10
71 Bektić (Ibrahim) Huso 1938 10 15 11
72 Bektić (Kiram) Kadrija 1974 4 18 4
73 Bektić (Suljo) Bekto 1940 9 5 2
74 Bešić (Mehmedalija) Mevludin 1943 3 28 16
75 Bešlija (Hasan) Hanka 1930 4 18 12
76 Borogovac (Nurdin) Emir 1974 1 81 34
77 Bošnjak (Ohran) Nurija 1968 3 9 11
78 Brgulja (Mehmed) Rešid 1929 4 19 5
79 Budić (Ibro) Ismet 1964 1 84 33
80 Buljubašić (Avdija) Hasan 1938 4 25 21
81 Burić (Meho) Mehmed 1965 4 20 5
82 Čakanović (Ćazim) Hazim 1964 7 17 26
83 Čakanović (Hilmo) Ćazim 1938 7 17 24
84 Čardaković (Hrustem) Behadil 1961 7 31 9
85 Čeliković (Osman) Šaban 1949 5 18 6
86 Ćerimović (Mustafa) Osman 1939 7 20 1
87 Ćerimović (Šaban) Nezir 1936 3 27 17
88 Delić (Alija) Mevludin 1956 9 14 11
89 Delić (Huso) Sejfo 1938 12 15 5
90 Delić (Ibrahim) Ibro 1959 1 15 5
91 Delić (Meho) Sead 1961 10 11 9
92 Delić (Nurko) Senahid 1967 8 10 16
93 Delić (Sado) Haso 1951 11 20 20
94 Delić (Selman) Ramo 1941 1 14 4
95 Delić (Suljo) Mehmed 1950 4 21 21
96 Demirović (Ibro) Ibrahim 1950 10 21 13
97 Dervišević (Huso) Senahid 1965 5 18 16
98 Dervišević (Zaim) Hajrudin 1936 11 22 20
99 Dizdarević (Hakija) Mehmedalija1960 9 7 4
100 Dizdarević (Hedib) Huso 1954 5 30 4
101 Dugonjić (Junuz) Enez 1975 12 15 10
102 Duraković (Bego) Ismet 1944 12 20 12
103 Duraković (Miralem) Mušan 1975 10 12 8
104 Duraković (Miralem) Naser 1971 10 12 7
105 Durić (Hilmo) Mumin 1935 12 20 7
106 Džananović (Šaćir) Nezir 1979 12 24 5
107 Džanić (Bekto) Musred 1955 3 31 15
108 Đogaz (Hamed) Sabahudin 1975 9 4 11
109 Đogaz (Mustafa) Munib 1974 9 3 11
110 Đogaz (Mustafa) Omer 1976 9 3 10
111 Đozić (Alija) Sadik 1955 1 84 7
112 Efendić (Besim) Azem 1938 11 23 16
113 Efendić (Besim) Mehmed 1932 11 23 17
114 Efendić (Husein) Avdo 1967 1 19 3
115 Efendić (Šemso) Ševko 1940 4 22 2
116 Emkić (Ibrahim) Elvedin 1979 10 25 15
117 Fazlić (Omer) Rešid 1931 9 18 1
118 Fejzić (Fadil) Mustafa 1959 12 19 3
119 Fejzić (Nurija) Hasan 1929 2 10 11
120 Fejzić (Šaban) Rijad 1977 11 24 21
121 Gabeljić (Azem) Ćamil 1943 7 22 22
122 Gabeljić (Bajro) Hašim 1950 7 15 29
123 Gabeljić (Hasan) Rasim 1940 5 19 29
124 Gabeljić (Nezir) Alija 1978 9 6 18
125 Gabeljić (Rasim) Mirsad 1966 5 19 28
126 Gabeljić (Sejfo) Omer 1960 3 28 4
127 Garaljević (Enez) Enver 1976 10 20 12
128 Garaljević (Enez) Nevres 1971 10 20 11
129 Garaljević (Ifet) Samir 1974 10 22 12
130 Gerović (Ibro) Hajro 1962 3 7 6
131 Gerović (Nurif) Nurija 1967 4 23 9
132 Gluhić (Mujo) Ibrahim 1932 3 30 13
133 Gobeljić (Bajro) Lutvo 1932 6 2 1
134 Gojčinović (Ahmet) Hamed 1970 4 25 10
135 Gurdić (Mujo) Hazim 1972 6 3 4
136 Gurdić (Mustafa) Junuz 1953 6 12 7
137 Gurdić (Zajim) Elvir 1976 6 14 4
138 Gušić (Sarija) Ibro 1938 5 15 11
139 Hadžibulić (Hašim) Dževad 1974 7 32 6
140 Hadžović (Alija) Azem 1939 10 22 17
141 Hadžović (Nezir) Bahrudin 1977 10 23 16
142 Hadžović (Nezir) Nezmir 1973 10 23 17
143 Hafizović (Mustafa) Ibrahim 1953 7 28 14
144 Hafizović (Mušan) Hasan 1951 12 19 12
145 Hajdarević (Bećir) Šahin 1945 12 18 4
146 Hajdarević (Suljo) Ibrahim 1943 11 16 40
147 Halilović (Adem) Alaga 1931 11 16 26
148 Halilović (Asim) Azmir 1972 4 25 17
149 Halilović (Bajro) Ibro 1972 11 12 49
150 Halilović (Emin) Ramo 1934 4 29 10
151 Halilović (Himzo) Hamed 1969 3 27 26
152 Halilović (Huso) Rifet 1960 10 24 12
153 Halilović (Ibrahim) Muhamed 1972 9 5 7
154 Halilović (Kadrija) Kadmir 1975 1 13 5
155 Halilović (Omer) Memiš 1937 1 83 20
156 Halilović (Ramo) Selim 1953 7 11 15
157 Halilović (Sabrija) Vedhad 1974 9 6 20
158 Halilović (Sado) Salih 1934 5 6 10
159 Halilović (Salih) Bahrudin 1975 5 6 9
160 Hamidović (Selmo) Selim 1956 3 9 7
161 Hamzabegović (Hajrudin) Fehim1970 11 15 40
162 Hamzabegović (Zuhdija) Safet 1968 11 15 36
163 Handžić (Alija) Hirkija 1976 9 8 2
164 Hasanović (Adem) Meho 1937 3 15 28
165 Hasanović (Adil) Nihad 1971 6 8 12
166 Hasanović (Alija) Ahmo 1977 2 10 9
167 Hasanović (Avdo) Ismet 1944 12 17 4
168 Hasanović (Avdo) Nusret 1953 12 16 4
169 Hasanović (Džemal) Fahret 1971 5 40 7
170 Hasanović (Hajro) Salih 1938 3 13 34
171 Hasanović (Hakija) Esad 1970 4 30 2
172 Hasanović (Hasan) Husein 1952 7 27 8
173 Hasanović (Himzo) Nurija 1963 1 82 34
174 Hasanović (Husejin) Senahid 1960 1 80 13
175 Hasanović (Ibrahim) Mehmed 1967 5 40 8
176 Hasanović (Ismet) Ermin 1971 2 8 7
177 Hasanović (Ismet) Jusuf 1976 12 17 5
178 Hasanović (Kadrija) Ismet 1968 9 13 6
179 Hasanović (Mušan) Rifet 1972 8 6 2
180 Hasanović (Ohran) Mevludin 1957 9 14 12
181 Hasanović (Osman) Mustafa 1930 11 20 34
182 Hasanović (Ramo) Kasim 1944 9 13 18
183 Hasanović (Rasim) Džemal 1961 4 32 3
184 Hasanović (Salčin) Osmo 1961 1 80 10
185 Hasanović (Salih) Mujo 1927 12 14 11
186 Hasanović (Sejfo) Hajro 1976 12 18 15
187 Hasanović (Sejfo) Hasib 1975 12 18 16
188 Hasanović (Selim) Bajro 1936 10 26 11
189 Hasanović (Selman) Šaban 1940 11 9 49
190 Hasanović (Šabo) Suljo 1953 3 13 30
191 Hasanović (Zahir) Ibiš 1952 4 33 1
192 Hasanović (Zahir) Ismet 1950 2 9 9
193 Hasić (Ahmo) Sead 1970 2 9 5
194 Hasić (Avdo) Ramo 1949 11 7 35
195 Hasić (Edhem) Munir 1975 12 24 9
196 Hasić (Omer) Jusuf 1950 12 19 13
197 Haskić (Fikret) Ahmo 1975 7 22 40
198 Hirkić (Adem) Suljo 1965 10 22 18
199 Hirkić (Husein) Sabahudin 1975 10 18 11
200 Hirkić (Suljo) Halid 1938 5 11 19
201 Hodžić (Arif) Zulfo 1939 5 15 20
202 Hodžić (Ibro) Mešan 1950 3 26 1
203 Hodžić (Juso) Huso 1965 7 14 33
204 Hodžić (Mujo) Hasan 1957 11 20 33
205 Hodžić (Munib) Sabahudin 1965 1 55 8
206 Hodžić (Salko) Husejin 1933 10 30 11
207 Hodžić (Salko) Sejfo 1958 2 12 13
208 Hodžić (Sejfo) Salko 1928 2 12 15
209 Hrnjić (Salko) Mehmed 1928 5 28 3
210 Hrustanović (Dahmo) Omer 1976 5 27 26
211 Hrustić (Omer) Pašan 1939 7 31 5
212 Hukić (Gajibija) Edhem 1976 5 25 2
213 Hurem (Mustafa) Hajra 1929. 7 25 39
214 Huremović (Hasan) Mirsad 1975 1 79 23
215 Huremović (Hasan) Mustafa 1977 1 79 24
216 Huremović (Mustafa) Ševko 1956 3 29 2
217 Husejinović (Fehim) Ramiz 1977 7 33 2
218 Husejnović (Atif) Feho 1948 3 12 12
219 Husejnović (Hasan) Haso 1960 1 47 7
220 Husejnović (Hašim) Azim 1966 10 29 11
221 Husejnović (Ibro) Dževad 1975 11 15 28
222 Husejnović (Nezir) Aziz 1961 9 15 9
223 Husejnović (Nezir) Mirsad 1968 9 15 10
224 Husejnović (Osman) Nedžad 1973 5 38 7
225 Husejnović (Šaban) Sabit 1954 5 35 7
226 Husić (Hasan) Safet 1969 6 8 10
227 Husić (Husein) Ramo 1953 8 26 6
228 Husić (Mehmed) Mujo 1971 7 26 39
229 Husić (Sado) Behadil 1941 7 21 10
230 Husić (Šaban) Dahmo 1962 12 23 12
231 Husić (Šaćir) Ševal 1968 11 12 38
232 Husić (Vejiz) Seid 1954 5 17 8
233 Ibišević (Omo) Ševko 1945 7 23 4
234 Ibišević (Salko) Rifet 1960 3 20 4
235 Ibrahimović (Atif) Ramo 1927 11 18 26
236 Ibrahimović (Avdo) Salčin 1929 12 25 5
237 Ibrahimović (Bećir) Ramo 1942 11 9 35
238 Ibrahimović (Džemal) Senad 1979 8 4 10
239 Ibrahimović (Omer) Džemail 1964 8 5 16
240 Ibrahimović (Suljo) Muhamed 1937 9 17 8
241 Ibrahimović (Vehbija) Hajdin 1962 11 18 25
242 Ibrić (Mujo) Alija 1947 12 20 6
243 Ibrić (Safet) Almir 1975 9 7 6
244 Imamović (Salih) Safet 1956 5 32 34
245 Imer (Mustafa) Faruk 1950 9 16 6
246 Imširović (Arif) Munib 1970 8 26 10
247 Izmirlić (Ibro) Ismet 1938 12 20 2
248 Jahić (Huso) Mehmed 1935 3 19 26
249 Jahić (Mehmed) Saib 1960 12 22 9
250 Jahić (Osman) Fehim 1958 9 2 7
251 Jakubović (Mujčin) Zikret 1977 5 12 12
252 Jakubović (Mujo) Fikret 1968 5 12 10
253 Jašarević (Huso) Salih 1938 10 15 6
254 Jašarević (Osman) Bajro 1942 5 38 4
255 Jašarević (Salih) Hazim 1969 10 15 5
256 Jugović (Dervo ) Hamed 1942 11 08 48
257 Jugović (Edhem) Sadudin 1969 11 7 46
258 Junuzović (Huso) Šaban 1948 7 24 33
259 Jusupović (Rešid) Teufik 1971 10 20 17
260 Kabilović (Salih) Hamed 1958 5 31 35
261 Kabilović (Zajim) Rešid 1959 1 78 5
262 Kadrić (Hasan) Hamed 1973 11 14 45
263 Kadrić (Ibro )Memiš 1942 12 15 6
264 Kandžetović (Bekto) Behaija 1961 3 6 13
265 Kandžetović (Bekto) Džemal 1971 3 6 12
266 Kapetanović (Meho ) Jusuf 1932 10 19 11
267 Kardašević (Husein) Azmir 1978 8 15 2
268 Karić (Džemal) Edin 1968 12 19 8
269 Karić (Ramo) Džemal 1938 12 19 7
270 Klančević (Halid) Sead 1964 7 10 18
271 Klempić (Sinan) Mulo 1939 2 11 17
272 Klinčević (Omer) Adem 1933 11 12 52
273 Kolarević (Mehmed) Hasib 1939 11 15 28
274 Kovačević (Meho) Osman 1929 3 19 8
275 Kozić (Hasan) Amir 1938 11 8 34
276 Krdžić (Abid) Bajro 1936 3 14 32
277 Krdžić (Aljo) Seid 1961 3 25 7
278 Kremić (Asim) Alaga 1963 1 17 3
279 Kumrić (Mujo) Ibrahim 1931 7 12 27
280 Kurtić (Hakija) Vahid 1954 12 18 14
281 Lemeš (Aljo) Ahmo 1945 10 18 15
282 Lemeš (Bekto) Munib 1953 10 19 15
283 Majstorović (Hasan) Huso 1968 5 17 20
284 Malagić (Hadžo) Ariz 1971 11 15 42
285 Malagić (Ohran) Izudin 1981 11 13 37
286 Malagić (Šaban) Vahidin 1968 3 20 36
287 Malić (Bajro) Hakija 1952 3 21 13
288 Malić (Mujo) Omer 1953 10 17 15
289 Malić (Omer) Enver 1977 10 17 14
290 Malkić (Behajija) Mevludin 1964 3 19 18
291 Mandžić (Juso) Ramo 1941 9 16 2
292 Mandžić (Ramo) Samir 1979 9 16 1
293 Mašić (Osmo) Džemal 1943 1 71 10
294 Mašić (Osmo) Hakija 1936 1 70 10
295 Mehanović (Atif) Smail 1968 12 14 1
296 Mehanović (Šaćir) Rifet 1956 9 16 17
297 Mehić (Hasan) Lutvo 1978 11 14 30
298 Mehić (Husein) Azim 1976 5 33 13
299 Mehić (Ramiz) Rahim 1974 11 14 31
300 Mehmedović (Abdurahman) Sead1954 4 06 6
301 Mehmedović (Adem) Adil 1962 3 23 18
302 Mehmedović (Ahmo) Muhamed 1975 3 22 27
303 Mehmedović (Alija) Rahman 1938 3 24 17
304 Mehmedović (Bećir) Abid 1953 11 9 43
305 Mehmedović (Bećir) Ramiz 1960 11 9 42
306 Mehmedović (Hasan) Omer 1978 7 21 1
307 Mehmedović (Haso) Hariz 1961 11 18 22
308 Mehmedović (Hašim) Dževad 1961 7 25 18
309 Mehmedović (Ibrahim) Lutvo 1966 11 10 36
310 Mehmedović (Mehmed) Salko 1929 10 24 16
311 Mehmedović (Meho) Hakija 1949 1 78 16
312 Mehmedović (Osman) Bešir 1947 1 71 2
313 Mehmedović (Osman) Husejin 1965 5 21 30
314 Mehmedović (Osman) Reuf 1969 5 21 26
315 Mehmedović (Osman) Šaban 1954 11 21 27
316 Mehmedović (Salih) Mušan 1941 8 25 6
317 Mehmedović (Senahid) Senad1978 5 16 11
318 Mekanić ef. (Mustafa) Junuz 1947 12 24 4
319 Memić (Alaga) Uzeir 1938 11 19 21
320 Memić (Huso) Rašid 1952 12 21 10
321 Merajić (Ibrahim) Sabrija 1943 5 25 20
322 Merajić (Ramo) Mulo 1969 3 31 11
323 Mešanović (Avdo) Salih 1920 7 17 22
324 Mešanović (Salih) Hajro 1964 3 24 11
325 Muharemović (Abdulah) Šahbaz1975 12 23 7
326 Muharemović (Hakija) Džemaludin1952 12 16 9
327 Muharemović (Rahman) Ibrahim1941 12 18 8
328 Muhić (Hašim) Šukrija 1936 6 10 5
329 Mujanović (Mujo) Muradif 1957 11 13 34
330 Mujčinović (Mujo) Avdulah 1964 10 20 16
331 Mujić (Alija) Abdulah 1970 11 21 19
332 Mujić (Alija) Halil 1978 12 15 11
333 Mujić (Alija) Hamdija 1973 11 21 20
334 Mujić (Alija) Salčin 1938 12 22 4
335 Mujić (Himzo) Izet 1964 3 14 10
336 Mujić (Kasim) Bego 1936 7 11 30
337 Mujić (Mehmed) Hasan 1961 7 14 36
338 Mujić (Mehmed) Jakub 1968 7 14 34
339 Mujić (Mujo) Bajro 1933 3 25 42
340 Mujić (Mustafa) Mujo 1946 11 12 37
341 Mujić (Ohran) Ibrahim 1955 3 5 9
342 Mujić (Ohran) Osman 1962 3 5 10
343 Mujić (Suljo) Junuz 1955 3 26 12
344 Mujić (Šaban) Redžep 1971 6 11 8
345 Mujić (Ševko) Hajrudin 1960 7 17 33
346 Mujkić (Ramo) Husein 1975 11 6 31
347 Mujkić (Ramo) Veid 1971 11 6 30
348 Mujkić (Redžo) Šaban 1955 11 13 48
349 Mulalić (Hajro) Senad 1966 7 10 17
350 Mulalić (Salih) Hajro 1941 7 10 16
351 Muminović (Adem) Ismet 1948 10 18 16
352 Muminović (Aljo) Mehmedalija 1954 3 25 29
353 Muminović (Fehim) Saudin 1981 1 70 9
354 Muminović (Fehim) Suljo 1979 1 70 8
355 Muminović (Idriz) Hasan 1950 12 17 15
356 Muminović (Mehmedalija) Mensur1977 3 24 29
357 Muminović (Munib) Nedžad 1974 11 10 50
358 Muminović (Šahin) Hamid 1963 3 24 7
359 Murathodžić (Nedžib) Munezir 1940 10 24 8
360 Muratović (Alija) Halil 1937 8 21 3
361 Muratović (Meša) Safet 1958 9 9 5
362 Muratović (Nurif) Ibrahim 1945 1 79 10
363 Mustafić (Adem) Amir 1979 4 19 2
364 Mustafić (Bekir) Jusuf 1956 1 78 8
365 Mustafić (Izet) Nevzet 1974 7 13 4
366 Mustafić (Nurija) Salko 1952 5 20 9
367 Mustafić (Omer) Mensur 1939 7 15 5
368 Mustafić (Osman) Nurija 1961 2 11 2
369 Mustafić (Rešid) Esed 1968 12 17 14
370 Mustafić (Safet) Sejdalija 1946 3 26 31
371 Mustafić (Salkan) Šaban 1942 11 8 45
372 Mustafić (Suljo) Edhem 1940 12 22 3
373 Muškić (Hašim) Šabo 1950 11 13 33
374 Nekić (Daut) Ejub 1954 7 27 38
375 Nuhanović (Abdurahman) Rasim 1966 9 12 6
376 Nuhanović (Abdurahman) Senahid1974 9 12 7
377 Nukić (Alija) Halil 1937 12 23 6
378 Nukić (Asim) Šemsudin 1965 11 11 51
379 Nukić (Hasan) Husejin 1946 12 23 11
380 Nukić (Ikan) Munib 1944 10 23 11
381 Nukić (Ikan) Ramo 1931 10 23 12
382 Nukić (Munib) Šefik 1968 2 7 3
383 Nukić (Rasim) Nermin 1978 1 80 12
384 Nukić (Šaban) Osman 1936 11 11 36
385 Numanović (Rašid) Nedžad 1972 5 27 12
386 Omerović (Abid) Adib 1977 12 16 15
387 Omerović (Alija) Hamdija 1971 10 17 10
388 Omerović (Feho) Fehim 1942 9 2 2
389 Omerović (Ibro) Husein 1978 11 17 34
390 Omerović (Mulo) Osmo 1970 3 20 16
391 Omerović (Mustafa) Said 1970 9 1 4
392 Omerović (Osman) Mahmut 1953 3 20 12
393 Omerović (Ramo) Ćamil 1974 11 23 22
394 Omerović (Selim) Abid 1952 12 16 14
395 Omerović (Suljo) Šaban 1947 7 30 7
396 Ordagić (Ibro) Nermin 1978 10 21 18
397 Orić (Behaija) Vejsil 1978 1 16 4
398 Orić (Šahin) Elvir 1976 12 14 5
399 Osmanović (Abdulah) Sulejman1980 5 40 04
400 Osmanović (Edhem) Edmir 1977 12 21 4
401 Osmanović (Edhem) Elvir 1977 12 21 5
402 Osmanović (Edhem) Ferida 1963. 12 13 2
403 Osmanović (Edhem) Hamdija 1947 3 31 23
404 Osmanović (Habib) Nermin 1971 9 5 14
405 Osmanović (Hasan) Šećo 1933 9 10 11
406 Osmanović (Junuz) Meho 1960 2 8 5
407 Osmanović (Mehmed) Hamed1941 10 18 1
408 Osmanović (Mehmed) Omer 1968 3 33 20
409 Osmanović (Mehmed) Salčin 1974 3 33 21
410 Osmanović (Munib) Ahmedin 1980 5 18 28
411 Osmanović (Mustafa) Elvir 1976 11 8 33
412 Osmanović (Omer) Ramo 1953 5 24 4
413 Osmanović (Osman) Muhibija1935 5 24 1
414 Osmanović (Osman) Safet 1920 3 33 2
415 Osmanović (Ramo) Nermin 1976 5 24 3
416 Osmanović (Safet) Mehmedalija1950 3 31 1
417 Osmanović (Salko) Rahman 1957 5 22 22
418 Osmanović (Sinan) Mehmedalija1953 1 29 1
419 Osmić (Bajro) Zehrudin 1971 11 18 23
420 Palalić (Ibrahim) Jusuf 1946 6 11 5
421 Pašalić (Hadžo) Muharem 1935 6 12 4
422 Pehratović (Bego) Suljo 1934 12 26 1
423 Pehratović (Ibrahim) Bajro 1947 1 54 3
424 Pehratović (Ramo) Juso 1936 1 54 1
425 Pehratović (Suljo) Lutvo 1963 12 26 2
426 Pirgić (Suljo) Smail 1978 11 15 31
427 Purković (Salkan) Nutfet 1949 7 20 40
428 Rahmić (Bekto) Dahmo 1955 7 26 45
429 Rahmić (Fahro) Mirsad 1973 3 32 27
430 Rahmić (Šaban) Islam 1960 5 29 37
431 Ramić (Redžep) Ibrahim 1971 11 19 22
432 Redžić (Imšir) Ramo 1930 12 14 10
433 Rizvanović (Ibrahim) Alija 1944 7 10 24
434 Salčinović (Abdurahman) Murat1959 5 23 23
435 Salić (Esed) Fahrudin 1975 9 11 33
436 Salihović (Avdo) Rifet 1953 7 17 20
437 Salihović (Ibro) Meho 1942 1 63 2
438 Salihović (Ibro) Safet 1945 11 17 27
439 Salihović (Lutvo) Mesud 1929 4 34 2
440 Salihović (Mehmed) Mustafa 1964 5 25 22
441 Salihović (Mujo) Hajrudin 1978 1 50 3
442 Salihović (Mujo) Ramiz 1954 11 16 25
443 Salihović (Murat) Safet 1942 1 77 7
444 Salihović (Ramo) Redžep 1953 5 27 32
445 Salihović (Rifet) Kiram 1972 7 7 21
446 Salihović (Safet) Ibrahim 1968 11 17 25
447 Salihović (Suljo) Senahid 1964 5 26 21
448 Salihović (Šahin) Ibrahim 1946 11 3 27
449 Salihović (Šemso) Mevludin 1953 10 19 16
450 Salkanović (Mustafa) Ibrahim 1936 3 17 8
451 Salkić (Abdulah) Elvis 1977 5 30 28
452 Salkić (Džano) Muhamed 1978 1 22 4
453 Salkić (Ramo) Samir 1972 12 16 10
454 Salkić (Zajko) Zulfo 1966 11 9 38
455 Sejdinović (Ahmo) Mehmedalija1958 5 28 19
456 Sejdinović (Jusuf) Munib 1963 12 18 3
457 Sejdinović (Mehmedalija) Bego1980 5 27 20
458 Sejdinović (Nezir) Mirsad 1973 12 19 2
459 Sejmenović (Alija) Senahid 1976 8 13 5
460 Selimović (Ahmet) Abdulah 1973 1 50 2
461 Selimović (Atif) Ševko 1946 7 11 10
462 Selimović (Hakija) Kadir 1956 2 28 23
463 Selimović (Hasib) Mevludin 1961 9 13 8
464 Selimović (Idriz) Aziz 1963 12 16 6
465 Selimović (Idriz) Munib 1965 12 16 5
466 Selimović (Idriz) Omer 1952 3 34 10
467 Selimović (Mehmed) Alija 1944 10 30 7
468 Selimović (Osman) Durmo 1934 12 22 8
469 Selimović (Osman) Selim 1938 12 20 11
470 Selimović (Ševko) Sabit 1974 7 11 13
471 Selimović (Ševko) Selim 1975 5 22 28
472 Selimović (Uzeir) Asim 1964 1 81 12
473 Sinanović (Dedo) Šaban 1946 7 22 45
474 Sinanović (Jusuf) Salih 1975 1 71 5
475 Sinanović (Ramo) Nurif 1919 5 28 27
476 Sinanović (Ramo) Safet 1927 5 29 27
477 Siručić (Nurija) Abid 1941 7 10 12
478 Siručić (Nurija) Mujo 1943 7 10 11
479 Smajić (Adem) Sejfo 1973 1 33 7
480 Smajić (Bilal) Murat 1973 11 7 31
481 Smajić (Emin) Bajro 1950 5 31 19
482 Smajić (Hamid) Azmir 1977 9 12 24
483 Smajić (Hasan) Haso 1941 9 10 16
484 Smajić (Omer) Jusuf 1938 9 12 23
485 Smajić (Salih) Sejdulah 1949 11 10 39
486 Smajić (Salko) Alija 1943 9 8 18
487 Smajilović (Šaban) Šahman 1932 4 4 12
488 Smajlagić (Bekir) Salih 1968 9 10 6
489 Smajlagić (Salih) Bekir 1936 9 10 7
490 Smajlović (Ahmet) Ševko 1939 7 18 13
491 Smajlović (Edhem) Nedžib 1947 12 18 13
492 Smajlović (Habib) Sabit 1953 12 23 2
493 Smajlović (Mešan) Hašim 1922 11 5 29
494 Smajlović (Ramiz) Samir 1977 11 12 46
495 Smajlović (Rašid) Rešad 1975 8 22 4
496 Smajlović (Šahman) Izet 1956 4 4 13
497 Smajlović (Ševko) Mesud 1962 9 3 15
498 Softić (Mehemed) Mujo 1929 3 29 14
499 Subašić (Fehim) Nermin 1977 11 22 19
500 Subašić (Ibrišim) Ago 1932 11 10 35
501 Sulejmanović (Alaga) Nusret 1959 12 24 10
502 Sulejmanović (Husein) Sejdalija1957 12 25 6
503 Suljaković (Šemso) Izet 1962 4 11 7
504 Suljić (Alija) Kemo 1977 7 20 30
505 Suljić (Bekir) Mujo 1978 5 32 32
506 Suljić (Hamdija) Muharem 1977 11 22 26
507 Suljić (Hamdija) Sulejman 1970 11 22 27
508 Suljić (Husejin) Kemal 1954 7 19 28
509 Suljić (Juso) Omer 1931 7 17 40
510 Suljić (Šaban) Alija 1940 7 10 27
511 Šahinović (Šaban) Adem 1970 12 17 9
512 Šaranović (Šaćir) Ševkija 1943 12 14 6
513 Šečić (Meho) Ismet 1938 10 26 7
514 Šehić (Ejub) Ramiz 1969 10 29 14
515 Šehomerović (Ohran) Omer 1946 11 24 17
516 Šeta (Zulfo) Nesib 1940 2 9 7
517 Špijodić (Himzo) Bego 1967 5 30 8
518 Špiodić (Idriz) Refik 1960 9 14 6
519 Tabaković (Abdulah) Sadik 1975 1 85 25
520 Tabaković (Osman) Ahmo 1939 1 85 7
521 Tabaković (Ramiz) Hazim 1979 5 35 21
522 Tabaković (Suljo) Muhamed 1955 9 16 8
523 Tepić (Abdulah) Faruk 1975 7 19 43
524 Tepić (Mujo) Jusuf 1938 7 19 40
525 Topalić (Ramiz) Asim 1959 10 23 1
526 Tursunović (Mujo) Daut 1945 8 7 12
527 Vejzović (Selim) Bajro 1940 7 31 8
528 Vejzović (Zejnil) Safet 1967 5 36 18
529 Vranjkovina (Ragib) Emin 1938 11 9 34
530 Vranjkovina (Ramiz) Đerziz 1976 7 26 30
531 Zejnilović (Zuhdija) Hidajet 1946 11 13 41
532 Zuhrić (Mehmed) Esad 1973 5 34 18
533 Zukanović (Suljo) Selim 1935 1 74 5
534 Ždero (Hamed) Rašid 1964 9 8 28

PHOTOS: PREPARATIONS FOR THE 14TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE SREBRENICA GENOCIDE

July 10, 2009 Comments off
On the even of the commemoration of the 14th anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide, preparations are ongoing for the burial of 534 victims of the genocide.

BACKGROUND: Serbs from heavily militarized villages around Srebrenica had terrorized Srebrenica population and constantly attacked neighbouring Bosnian Muslim villages from 1992-1995. In July 1995 the Bosnian Serb army staged a brutal takeover of Srebrenica and its surrounding area, where they proceeded to perpetrate genocide. Bosnian Serb soldiers separated Bosniak families, forcibly expelled 25,000-30,000 people, summarily executed at least 8,372 boys, men, and elderly, and dumped them into mass graves.

Meanwhile, last preparations for the funeral of victims are being performed in Visoko. Remains of the victims will be transported to Sarajevo, and then to the final resting peace at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial in Potocari.



MIDHAT SALIHOVIC ARRESTED AND RELEASED

July 8, 2009 Comments off
Those who planned and organized the Srebrenica genocide now try to revise the history and blame the victims of genocide for alleged war crimes against Chetniks around Srebrenica; yes, same Chetniks who were located in the heavily militarized Serb villages around Srebrenica and participated in the attacks on the town of Srebrenica and local Bosnian Muslim villages.

PHOTO: In April 1992, photojournalist Ron Haviv (video) photographed evidence of Serbs committing Bosnian Genocide and killing Bosniak civilians in the town of Bijeljina.

A number of NGOs have deplored the arrest of Midhat Salihović, one of Srebrenica genocide survivors accused by the Serb Entity (RS) of war crimes.

It is important to note that RS planned and organized the 1995 Srebrenica genocide and they have no authority to make bogus claims about alleged war crimes of Bosniaks. Instead, they should worry about crimes that Serbs, from heavily militarized Serb villages around Srebrenica, committed against hundreds of Bosniak villages in the area, including numerous massacres and widespread ethnic cleansing against the Bosnian Muslim population of Podrinje in 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. After having been questioned, Midhat Salihovic was released from custody.

According to the NGOs, Salihović, who lives in Sweden, had traveled to Potočari to attend the funeral of his father and brother, both victims of the genocide, and was arrested on Saturday on a warrant issued by the Bijelina District Court, where he is suspected of war crimes against the Srebrenica Serbs.

Following the arrest of Salihovic, survivors associations from Srebrenica threatened to cancel this year’s 14th anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide.

Munira Subasic, President of the Association of “Mothers of Srebrenica and Zepa Enclaves, said the associations would submit a request to the Prosecution and Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina, calling on them to “take over all cases and suspects” from the Srebrenica and eastern Bosnia areas, because local courts “have nothing to do with them”.

“Secondly, we request the Parliament of Bosnia and Herzegovina to render a decision declaring July 11 as a day of mourning. In other words, we call on it to adopt the Resolution already adopted by the European Parliament. The fact that the flag will be lowered in front of the European Parliament building on July 11, while one Entity in our country will mourn and the second one will celebrate is shameful,” Subasic told Justice Report.

A joint statement from Women in Black (Belgrade), JUKOM, the Helsinki Committee for Human Rights in Serbia and the Youth Initiative for Human Rights expresses “anger“ over “this cynical and criminal move by the Bijelina court.“

The NGOs focused their anger on the Republic of Srpska (RS) authorities, headed by Prime Minister Milorad Dodik, and the Bijelina courts, who, “instead of going after criminals, are persecuting the survivors of the genocide.“

Neither do the Serbian authorities nor President Boris Tadić escape the NGOs’ wrath, who, they say, “continue to work towards a relativization of the criminal past and display full understanding for Milorad Dodik’s criminal policy.“

The NGOs also criticize the international community for “tolerating Milorad Dodik’s secessionist and, essentially, belligerent policy,“ which “does nothing to bring its powers in Bosnia-Herzegovina to bear on eliminating sources of future wars and future genocides.“

In the statement, the NGOs call on the Serbian authorities “to at least distance themselves from the aggressive and dangerous policy“ of the RS, and urge the international community to work energetically to prevent attempts to equate crimes and victims, and to put a stop to the dangerous policies pursued by Dodik and the remaining RS political forces.

“On behalf of all the citizens of Serbia who have not lost their human dignity, we once again voice our solidarity with the families of the victims of the genocide in Srebrenica, as well as our resolve never to forget the crimes perpetrated in our name,“ the statement stresses.

The Bosnian prosecution announced today that Salihović, whom the RS authorities arrested two days ago on suspicion of crimes committed against Serbs in Srebrenica, had not been detained on a Bosnian warrant, nor had that institution issued a warrant for his arrest.

The Bosnian prosecution added that members of the Bosnian border police had arrested Salihović at the Orašje border crossing on Saturday, on a warrant issued by the Bijelina District Court.

SERBS CELEBRATE, BOSNIAKS BURY GENOCIDE VICTIMS

July 8, 2009 5 comments
HATRED INSPIRED CELEBRATIONS: Local Serbs who attacked and destroyed hundreds of Bosnian Muslim villages around Srebrenica and in Podrinje from 1992-1995, and those among them who participated in the Srebrenica genocide, now celebrate July 11th as a ‘PARTY TIME.’

PHOTO: A poster in Bratunac calling on all local Serbs to throw a party on the day of Srebrenica Genocide, 11 July 2009. Bratunac was a town with pre-war Bosnian Muslim ethnic majority. Now, it’s ethnically cleansed town controlled by Serbs who organized numerous massacres against the local Bosniak population in 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995.

While family and friends of the Srebrenica genocide victims spend time grieving and burying more than 500 DNA-identified victims this July 11th, Serbs in the nearby Ljubovija Municipality will celebrate “Drinska Regatta” along the River Drina, reports Sarajevo Daily Dnevni Avaz.

According to the Bosniak Representative Šefket Hafizović, Vice-President of the National Assembly of Republika Srpska, this is just another indicator of how the official policy of Belgrade failed to distance itself from the regime of Slobodan Milosevic.

“They never departed from Milosevic’s policy. Criminals return to the place where they committed crime – this time not to grieve, but to celebrate genocide. And all this happens at the same time when the democratic world, throughout Europe, is honoring victims of the genocide in accordance with the European Parliament’s Srebrenica Genocide Resolution… the resolution which proclaimed 11th of July as a Day of Commemoration of the Srebrenica genocide throughout the European Union (EU). At the same time, followers of Slobodan Milosevic will organized a party on the River Drina,” said Hafizovic.

Families of the genocide victims feel bitter. They feel that the act of organizing this regatta on the day when the Srebrenica genocide victims will be buried is nothing more than a carefully planned provocation to cause anger among relatives and survivors of the genocide.

“This is a great shame and one more humiliation, among many humiliations that families of genocide victims and survivors have to go through. Serbs will rejoice in celebrations when we – mothers, and other people of conscious – cry? Obviously, they are still looking forward to the crimes they committed in 1995,” said Munira Subasic, president of the Association “Mothers of Enclaves Srebrenica and Žepa.”

PHOTO: Local Serbs use July 11th to mock the Srebrenica genocide victims and to party on the River Drina, where thousands of Bosnian Muslims have been slaughtered and dumped.