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PRESIDENT OF BOSNIA BLASTS UNITED NATIONS AND WARNS THAT 200,000 DIED IN BOSNIAN GENOCIDE

September 29, 2008 2 comments

On September 23, 2008 Haris Silajdzic reminded U.N. that during 1990s 200,000 people died in the Bosnian Genocide (see photos)

PHOTO: Haris Silajdzic, Chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina, addresses the general debate of the sixty-third session of the General Assembly in New York, September 23rd 2008.

Quick Points: In a vehement denunciation of widespread genocide denial, the President of Bosnia-Herzegovina, Dr Haris Silajdzic, warned the United Nations to be more pro-active in preventing genocides and correcting past mistakes. Dr Silajdzic, who disagrees with RDC figures which account for 100,000 dead in Bosnia, warned the UN that according to the International Red Cross Committee data “200,000 people were killed during the Bosnian war, 12,000 of them children, while 50,000 women were raped, with 2.2 million people forced to leave their homes.” He reminded the World that was a true genocide and blasted the UN for bearing partial responsibility for Srebrenica genocide.

Dr Haris Silajdzic, the presiding member of the presidency of Bosnia-Herzegovina, visited New York last week and started his seven-day summit to remind the World to be more pro-active in preventing genocides and correcting past mistakes.

At the initiative of American-Jewish Committee, Dr Silajdzic met with the Jewish delegation, led by Mr Andrew Bauer and Mr Herbert Bloc, and thanked them for the help their Committee was giving Bosnia so far. Dr Silajdzic attended the opening ceremony of the 4th Annual Meeting of Clinton Global Initiative (CGI), a meeting about developing needs of the world, organized by Bill Clinton, former President of the USA. He also attended the reception organized by US President George Bush for presidents who have peace troops stationed in Iraq, and the one organized by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon for heads of state attending the UN General Assembly.

In his address to the UN General Assembly last week, Dr Haris Silajdzic has called on the UN to correct the mistakes made during the Bosnian Genocide. He has also demanded that the UN send the message that genocide cannot be rewarded.

“Some in the international community insisted on maintaining the arms embargo imposed by the UN Security Council in 1991, thus adding to the obviously overwhelming military advantage of Milosevic’s regime that was bent on destroying Bosnia and its people. They justified this course by claiming that the lifting of the embargow ould add oil to the fire. The result, inevitably, was quelling that fire the blood of the innocent,” – Dr Silajdzic said.

The president of Bosnia-Herzegovina quoted the International Red Cross Committee data which says that 200,000 people were killed during the Bosnian war, 12,000 of them children, while 50,000 women were raped, with 2.2 million people forced to leave their homes. “That was true genocide,” he said. “This was a veritable genocide and sociocide. The intent of the perpetrators of this genocide was to forever destroy the unique multi-ethnic fabric of Bosnia and Herzegovina through mass slaughter, rapes, torture, abuse, expulsion and plunder.” He added that “despite of this, defenders of our country conducted themselves honorably, as demonstrated by the ICTY acquittals of most of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s military leadership.”

Dr Silajdzic reminded the World about Srebrenica genocide referring to the International Court of Justice’s verdict, which stated that “those were the acts of genocide committed by the members of the Republic of Srpska (RS) army in and around the town of Srebrenica from July 13, 1995, until the end of the war.”

The United Nations must take action to reverse the de facto “ethnic apartheid” that has taken root in Bosnia and Herzegovina, as part of efforts to redress the failure surrounding the Srebrenica genocide, Silajdzic warned. The UN has acknowledged that, by its own acts and omissions, it is partially responsible for the July 1995 Srebrenica killings in which more than 8,000 Bosniak Muslim men and boys lost their lives, casting a shadow over the world body forever, said Dr Silajdzic.

“We do not want the United Nations to be haunted,” he told world leaders gathered at UN Headquarters in New York. “This Organization’s credibility is too important to the world to carry the burden of this failure.” Rather, the world body must ensure that mistakes are not repeated and that past errors are corrected, Mr. Silajdzic stressed.

“Without righting this wrong, can we genuinely celebrate the 60th anniversary of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights this December. Moreover, can we celebrate the 60th anniversary of the adoption of the Genocide Convention if the first and only judgment of the international Court of Justice on the crime of genocide remains in the archives of that Court?” – asked Dr Silajdzic. “Certainly, there are those in Bosnia-Herzegovina who would not agree with this, but they are surely not the victims of genocide,” – he added.

“We cannot bring back the dead, but we can give dignity and justice to the survivors,” he said. “What we say today is not aimed at the past, but at the future, and not only for Bosnia and Herzegovina.”

Despite the positive results delivered by the 1995 Dayton Peace Agreement, many key issues remain, including the blocking of ‘minority’ returns by the authorities of the Republika Srpska, an entity within the country, by either directly taking part in violence or by not protecting people from attacks due to their ethnic background, Dr Silajdzic said.

One day ahead of Silajdzic’s speech in New York, the Serb representative in the Bosnian presidency Nebojsa Radmanovic sent a letter to the UN General Assembly stating that the address would be Dr Silajdzic’s personal opinion and not an official position of Bosnia-Herzegovina, adding that a three-member presidency did not reach a consensus on his appearance before the assembly.

Dr Silajdzic responded back with a letter to the UN Secretary- General, and the UN General Assembly President, in relation to Mr. Mr Radmanovic’s letter, sent to those officials. Chairman Silajdzic underlined in his letter that Mr Radmanovic’s claims in fact represent his personal view, and contain a series of factual oversights. First and foremost, Dr Silajdzic emphasized that the BiH Presidency, on May 28, at the 38th regular session, adopted a decision authorizing Dr Silajdzic, as BiH Presidency Chairman, to represent Bosnia and Herzegovina at the 63rd session of the UN General Assembly, including the need for a general debate on that assembly. This decision was made unanimously, including the vote of Mr Radmanovic.

Bosnian Croat member of Bosnia-Herzegovina’s Presidency, Mr Zeljko Komsic, issued a press release stating that “it must be clearly underlined and emphasized that, at least, Dayton Peace Agreement was not obligatory to sign, as well as April package of constitutional changes” for which Dr Silajdzic was responsible. “B-H Presidency Chairman Silajdzic should be reminded that unfortunately for most of B-H citizens, genocide was rewarded by the mere act of signing of Dayton Peace Agreement.”

In his address the UN General Assembly in New York, Dr Silajdzic said that the Dayton peace deal, apart from bringing peace, was intended to “annul the results of genocide and ethnic cleansing” and “was never meant to “maintain ethnic apartheid in Bosnia-Herzegovina”. He said that “rewarding genocide could send a dangerous message to the world that would most certainly jeopardize the chances for permanent peace and stability in Bosnia and in the rest of the region.”

Before his departure from Sarajevo to the U.N. General Assembly, Bosnian media reported that Dr Dilajdzic said that the Serb Republic was using a U.S. lobbying group to promote its interests among U.S. officials on issues such as foreign trade, diplomatic relations, and constitutional and other reforms. He accused the Serb Republic of trying to “position itself as a separate and independent international entity.”

The Serb Republic hired Quinn Gillespie & Associates LCC in 2007 for about $1.5 million per year to lobby for what it said were its cultural, economic and sports interests.

Dr Silajdzic is also widely quoted in the Bosnian media as saying that he will take the Serb Republic to the constitutional court over its decision to pull out from the state electricity network it formed along with the federation to enable Bosnia to join the southeast Europe’s energy community. The international community involved in the implementation of Bosnia’s peace process said the Serb Republic’s move was illegal and asked the government to revoke it.

DUTCH COURT DISMISSES SREBRENICA CASE AGAINST NETHERLANDS

September 11, 2008 4 comments

“One could not have expected a different verdict, because we are dealing with the state, which doesn’t want to accept its responsibility.” – Munira Subasic.

PHOTO: Relatives Mehida Mustafic-Majic, sitting left, her daughter Alma, center, and her son Damir, right, leave the court after the verdict at the District Court in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008.

A Dutch civil court sided with the Dutch state and dismissed the case against the Netherlands for their failure to prevent Srebrenica genocide in 1995. The Srebrenica enclave had been declared a UN “Safe Haven” under the control of Dutchbat before the massacre took place. Dutch soldiers allowed Serb forces to take away more than 8,000 Bosniak men, children, and elderly – actions which resulted in the worst massacre and the first genocide since the World War II in Europe. Thousands of Bosniak women were forcibly deported from the enclave in a U.N.-assisted ethnic cleansing.

The lawsuit against the Netherlands was brought by Hasan Nuhanovic and the family of Rizo Mustafic. Nuhanovic is a survivor of Srebrenica genocide who lost his mother, father and brother in the massacre. Mustafic, who worked as an electrician in the U.N. force’s Dutch battalion (Dutchbat), also died during the Srebrenica genocide. The plaintiffs claimed that both the UN and the Dutch troops failed to take effective action to prevent the massacre, thus violating the UN Convention on genocide.

In June, the Dutch court also rejected another lawsuit brought forward by the association Mothers of Srebrenica, which sought to sue the UN for damages for having failed to protect local civilians and to prevent the massacre.

The latest court ruling said that the Dutch soldiers had acted under the UN flag and the Dutch state could therefore not be held accountable, saying the “actions must be attributed exclusively to the United Nations.” The court ruling also added that if national courts were to start judging United Nations actions and operations, it could have significant negative effects on the future work and decision-making of the UN Security Council.

PHOTO: Hasan Nuhanovic talks to the media after the judgement at the District Court in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008.

The president of the Mothers of Srebrenica association, Munira Subasic, who lost 22 members of her family in the massacres said that “One could not have expected a different verdict, because we are dealing with the state, which doesn’t want to accept its responsibility.”

“Many Dutch soldiers became mentally ill after their Srebrenica mandate where they witnessed mass slaughter and killings,” Subasic said. “It is also known that the Netherlands was sued by its own soldiers,” she added.

“None of the points we presented as evidence to the court over the last six years has been accepted. They have all been rejected. This is a total denial of all accusations presented by the two families,” said Hasan Nuhanovic.

“I have repeated thousands of times that I am not here to blame Dutchbat for their passivity,” Nuhanovic said. “I am accusing them of being active – in violation of the human rights of my family and other refugees. I noticed the judge read several times the sentence ‘under the UN flag’. They referred to the flag under which these Duchbat actions were conducted. However, these actions were conducted under the flag of the Netherlands as well.”

Hasan Nuhanovic said that he feels betrayed by the Dutchbat, “I have been betrayed so many times before by people in my life. The moment I was betrayed was 13 years ago was when I was working with Dutch battalion soldiers, UN officials who knew me and my family personally, they sent my family out to die.”

In June, Nuhanovic had told the court how the Dutch troops expelled his family from the safety of the U.N. compound in Srebrenica. “My mother was crying, I was crying. The only person that wasn’t crying was my brother. He was 22 and very proud. ‘Hasan, don’t beg them for my life any more.'”

Laywer for the Plaintifs, Liesbeth Zegveld, said it was unprecedented that the court did not recognise the suffering of the claimants in any way. “Justice is not a science. It is a choice to see it purely in legal terms.”

SREBRENICA GENOCIDE SURVIVORS AWAIT COURT DECISION

September 9, 2008 1 comment
Decision due on 10.9.2008 at The Hague in first civil court action brought by Srebrenica survivors against Dutch state

Why were Ibro, Nasiha and Muhamed Nuhanovic and Rizo Mustafic sent to their deaths when the United Nations had promised to ensure their safety?

Today the Netherlands District Court in The Hague will deliver its verdict on whether the Dutch state and its contingent of United Nations peace-keeping troops can be held responsible for handing over Bosnian refugees who had looked to them for protection to be murdered by Serb soldiers in July 1995.

“We hope that the Dutch government, along with the international community, will finally accept responsibility for the deaths of 8376 men and boys from the town and for their surviving relatives”, declared GfbV/STP General Secretary Tilman Zülch, speaking in Göttingen, Germany, today. “The eyes and thoughts of all the survivors of the massacre who hold the Dutch UN troops and the Dutch government responsible for the the death of their defenceless relatives are focused on The Hague. The judges must not disappoint them.”

In July 1995 Bosnians who had sought refuge In the UN forces’ base at Potocari were ordered by Dutch UN peacekeepers to leave the safety of the base and sent to face the prospect of certain death with Bosnian refugees already being killed and raped by Serb soldiers only a few metres outside the area under UN protection . The UN forces even denied protection to Bosnians who were known personally to them and to the family of their interpreter.

Six years ago the family of electrician Rizo Mustafic, who was murdered at Srebrenica, and Hasan Nuhanovic, whose parents and brother were also among those killed, began their civil action in the District Court at The Hague. They sought to hold the Dutch state accountable for the failings of the Dutch UN battalion. What the court has to determine is whether the Dutch government and the Dutch command within UNPROFOR should be held accountable for the shameful conduct of Dutch forces who were more concerned for their own safety than they were for the protection of the civilians in their care.

Hasan Nuhanovic lost his parents and his younger brother. His father’s remains have been found in a mass grave and identified but the fate of his mother and brother remains unknown. Many mass graves were subsequently dug up by Serb troops using bulldozers to conceal the evidence. The remains were reburied elsewhere.

Alma Mustafic, daughter of the murdered Rizo Mustafic, has written to GfbV that, “Deep in my heart I am hoping that the court will deliver a just verdict and that these crimes will not be trivialised or denied.”

Background: the tragedy of the Nuhanovic family: Hasan Nuhanovic spent the night of 12-13 July 1995 with his parents and brother in a makeshift office on the UNPROFOR base at Potocari, on the outskirts of Srebrenica, working to the orders of the Dutch officer Andre de Haan. De Haan, who was staying in the same room with them and a doctor and nurse, had in the past been a welcome guest of the family and had enjoyed Mrs Nuhanovic’s cooking.

Nevertheless he did nothing to help her as she came close to breaking down on hearing that nine men had been killed in the area in front of the UNPROFOR base . The following morning, between 5 and 6 a.m., de Haan said, “Hasan, tell your mother, your brother and your father they must leave the base.”

Nuhanovic has painstakingly researched the story of the terrible events at Srebrenica which he documented in meticulous detail in his 550-page book, “Under the UN Flag”, before taking his case to court.

Jasna Causevic, GfbV/STP’s Southern Europe desk officer, can be contacted in The Hague by telephone on +49 179 524 35 38.

DISTRICT COURT’S RULING AWAITED ON THE DUTCH STATE’S FAILURE TO PROTECT CIVILIAN REFUGEES FROM GENOCIDE AT SREBRENICA

September 9, 2008 Comments off
Judgment in two civil actions due to be given at 10 a.m. on 10 September 2008 in the District Court at The Hague (Prins Clauslaan 60, The Hague, Netherlands).

On 10 September 2008 the District Court at The Hague will give its decision in the first civil actions brought against the Dutch State by relatives of the victims of genocide at Srebrenica. Hasan Nuhanovic and the family of Rizo Mustafic are seeking to establish that the Dutch state is responsible for the failure of Dutch troops acting under a United Nations mandate to protect their family members who were massacred at Srebrenica in July 1995.

Hasan Nuhanovic, a U.N. interpreter who lost his father, mother and younger brother, and the family of Rizo Mustafic, an electrician employed by the Dutch battalion of the United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR), claim that the Dutch government failed to protect the lives of their relatives after the safe area established by U.N. Security Council Resolution around the town of Srebrenica in Eastern Bosnia was allowed to fall into the hands of the Bosnian Serb Army.

The Nuhanovic and Mustafic families were among thousands of refugees who sought protection inside the compound of the U.N. base at Potocari but were handed over by the Dutch UNPROFOR forces to Serb General Ratko Mladic. Dutch soldiers in U.N. blue helmets are alleged to have watched on as women and young girls were taken away and raped and men and boys separated before being taken away for summary execution.

In a tort action against the Dutch state in which much of the legal debate has revolved around the division of responsibility between the United Nations and national states, the plaintiffs’ lawyer Liesbeth Zegveld has argued that the Dutch government and the Dutch command within UNPROFOR were responsible for the gross negligence shown by Dutch troops, they were primarily concerned for the safety of their national contingent and they showed scant regard for the safety of the civilian population entrusted to their care.

The families have been concerned above all to establish the truth about why Ibro, Nasiha and Muhamed Nuhanovic and Rizo Mustafic were sent to their deaths in brutal circumstances when the United Nations had promised to ensure their safety.

The final hearing before the District Court on 16 June 2008 took place before the arrest of Radovan Karadzic, President of the Bosnian Serb Republika Srpska. Since the hearing Karadzic has been charged with responsibility for the genocide at Srebrenica and is currently in The Hague awaiting trial before the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia.

Contact person:Prof. Dr Liesbeth Zegveld, Böhler Franken Koppe Wijngaarden (BFKW) , Attorneys, Keizersgracht 560-562, Amsterdam 1017 EM, Tel.: +31 20 – 344 62 00, Fax: +31 20 – 344 62 01, e-mail: <lzegveld@bfkw.nl>

Prof. Dr. Liesbeth Zegveld studied law at Utrecht. She obtained her doctorate with distinction in 2000 and was sworn in as an attorney in Amsterdam the same year. In 2005 she became a partner at Böhler Franken Koppe Wijngaarden, where she is a member of the international law & human rights department. She has written many articles on issues in the field of international humanitarian law. She is a guest lecturer at the University of Amsterdam and a member of the International Law Association’s Committee for Compensation for War Victims. In September 2006 she was appointed professor of International Humanitarian Law, in particular the Rights of Women and Children, at Leiden University.

DUTCH GRAFFITI IN SREBRENICA: SICKENING LEGACY OF THE UNITED NATIONS IN SREBRENICA

June 27, 2008 25 comments
WARNING: Some of the material that the United Nations’ Dutcbat ‘peacekeepers’ left in Srebrenica is explicit and highly offensive. Proceed viewing this material at your own risk.

Intro: This is the mountain road south of town where Dutch UN troops maintained observation posts. Facing the Bosnian Serb offensive in July 1995, the Dutch retreated without firing a shot. The town was taken, and the genocide of over 8,000 Bosniaks began. The forcible transfer (ethnic cleansing) of tens of thousands of people was assisted by the United Nations.

(can click on images for higher resolution photos)

Almost 13 years after the worst European genocide since World War II, the Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica still serve as a reminder of a shameful Dutch incompetence and a sickening arrogance they had towards their UN mission and people they ought to protect.

Oblivious to the fact that a horrible genocide was just about to happen before their eyes, the Dutch troops stationed at the UN base in Potocari spent their time “decorating” walls with drawings and graffiti. Some of these disgusting Dutch graffiti are XXX-rated, so it’s up to you whether you want to proceed with viewing this sickening material that Dutch soldiers left behind themselves in Srebrenica…

PHOTO: While people of Srebrenica were starving, Dutch U.N. ‘peacekeepers’ enjoyed T-bone Steaks, Spare Ribs, Schnitzels (see the ‘Dutchbat Menu’ above) and XXX-rated porn, as you will see from disgusting Dutch graffiti below…. Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: XXX-rated Dutch graffiti (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari) in Srebrenica, see right side wall drawing. Man in the photo is Abdulah, one of few who survived the four-day-long march through the forests around Srebrenica while the Serb Chetniks were shelling them with artillery and committing genocide in and around Srebrenica.

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica read “My ass is like a local. It’s got the smell same. Bosnia ’94” (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).
PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica read “I’m your best friend. I kill you for nothing. Bosnie 94.” (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).


PHOTO: XXX-rated Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica read “No Teeth…! A Mustache…? Smel Like Shit…? Bosnian Girl!” (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica read “UN, United Nothing.” (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: XXX-rated Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: XXX-rated Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: ” Lick my Ass.” Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: “Nema Problema” translates as “No Problems” in Bosnian language. Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

PHOTO: Dutch graffiti in Srebrenica read “No Teeth…! A Mustache…? Smel Like Shit…? Bosnian Girl!” (Dutchbat Camp in Potocari).

NETHERLANDS: SREBRENICA GENOCIDE SURVIVORS ATTEND COURT HEARING AGAINST THE DUTCH STATE

June 17, 2008 2 comments
A Dutch court has begun hearing a civil action brought against the Netherlands by relatives of victims of the 1995 Srebrenica genocide in Bosnia. Meanwhile, at a vigil outside the Dutch court, Srebrenica genocide survivors and victims’ relatives held up a long banner inscribed with the names of at least 8,106 victims – many of them defenceless children and elderly…

PHOTO: Hasan Nuhanovic, Srebrenica genocide survivor.

By Foo Yun Chee / REUTERS
(Republished for fair use only, as defined by the Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107)

A survivor of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre who says Dutch U.N. troops guarding the Bosnian town allowed Bosnian Serb forces to murder his family told a Dutch court on Monday he wanted justice for his loss.

Hasan Nuhanovic and the family of another Srebrenica victim are suing the Dutch state for negligence over its troops’ role in the 1992-95 Bosnian war. The court will hear a separate civil suit on Wednesday filed by about 6,000 relatives of Srebrenica massacre victims against the Dutch state and the United Nations.

More than 8,000 Bosnian Muslim (Bosniak) men and boys were killed at Srebrenica, a U.N. safe haven guarded by a Dutch army unit serving as part of a United Nations force, after Bosnian Serb forces commanded by Ratko Mladic overran it on July 11, 1995.

Nuhanovic, a U.N. interpreter who launched his case in 2002, says his father, mother and younger brother were killed after they were expelled from the town’s Dutch military base. He says he was allowed to stay because he had a U.N. identity card.

“If I had not done this, I would not be able to go on with my life. I am seeking justice,” Nuhanovic told Reuters ahead of the court hearing in The Hague.

Lawyer Liesbeth Zegveld, representing Nuhanovic and the family of Rizo Mustafic, an electrician in the U.N. force ‘s Dutch battalion who also died in the massacre, told judges the Dutch state had been grossly negligent and violated human rights through the actions of its soldiers in Srebrenica.

“One life could have been saved, my dad,” Mustafic’s daughter, Alma, told the court. “He was entitled to Dutch protection, this was confirmed to us, but he was not given it. He fell into Serbian hands, since then we have not heard anything about him.”

At a vigil outside the court earlier on Monday, about 50 relatives and Srebrenica survivors held up a long banner inscribed with the names of the 8,106 victims.

Government lawyers said Mustafic was not evacuated because he was a temporary worker and not a U.N. employee.

“The acts of the Dutch battalion are attributable to the U.N. and not to the Dutch state,” the lawyers told the court. “The Dutch state made available soldiers for the peacekeeping mission, to keep apart fighting parties. The fact they didn’t succeed does not mean they are liable for the atrocities.”

The Netherlands has said its troops were abandoned by the U.N., which gave them no air support. The families’ lawyers have said public documents show a network of Dutch military officials within the U.N. blocked air support because they feared their soldiers could be hit by “friendly fire”.

Judges said they would issue their ruling on September 10.

Munira Subasic, head of an association of mothers bereaved by the massacre, and who will be a witness for the suit to be heard on Wednesday, said she hoped for justice for Nuhanovic “and all others who experienced genocide under the protection of the U.N. and before the eyes of the whole world”.

The Dutch government led by Wim Kok resigned in 2002 after a report on the massacre blamed politicians for sending the Dutch U.N. troops on an impossible mission. Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic and Mladic, both indicated for genocide over Srebrenica, are still at large.

THE DUTCH STATE FAILED IN ITS DUTY TO PROTECT CIVILIAN VICTIMS OF GENOCIDE AT SREBRENICA

June 3, 2008 6 comments
PRESS RELEASE

Amsterdam, 3 June 2008:

Civil action due to be heard at 10 a.m. on 16 June 2008 in the District Court at The Hague (Prins Clauslaan 60, The Hague, Netherlands).

On 16 June 2008 the District Court at The Hague will hear the first civil action brought against the Dutch State by relatives of the victims of genocide at Srebrenica. Hasan Nuhanovic and the family of Rizo Mustafic are seeking to establish that the Dutch state is responsible for the failure of Dutch troops acting under a United Nations mandate to protect their family members massacred at Srebrenica in July 1995.

Hasan Nuhanovic, a U.N. interpreter who lost his father, mother and younger brother, and the family of Rizo Mustafic, an electrician employed by the Dutch battalion of the United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR), claim that the Dutch government failed to protect the lives of their relatives after the safe area established by U.N. Security Council Resolution around the town of Srebrenica in Eastern Bosnia was allowed to fall into the hands of the Bosnian Serb Army.

The Nuhanovic and Mustafic families were among thousands of refugees who sought protection inside the compound of the U.N. base at Potocari but were then delivered by the Dutch UNPROFOR forces into the hands of Serb General Ratko Mladic. Dutch soldiers in U.N. blue helmets are alleged to have watched on as women and young girls were taken away and raped and men and boys separated before being taken away for summary execution.

In a tort action against the Dutch state in which much of the legal debate revolves around the division of responsibility between the United Nations and national states, the plaintiffs’ lawyer Liesbeth Zegveld will argue that the Dutch government and the Dutch command within UNPROFOR were responsible for the gross negligence shown by Dutch troops, were primarily concerned for the safety of their national contingent and showed scant regard for the safety of the civilian population entrusted to their care.

The families are concerned above all to establish the truth about why Ibro, Nasiha and Muhamed Nuhanovic and Rizo Mustafic were allowed to go to their deaths in brutal circumstances when the United Nations had promised to ensure their safety.

Contact person:
Prof. Dr Liesbeth Zegveld, Böhler Franken Koppe Wijngaarden (BFKW) , Attorneys, Keizersgracht 560-562, Amsterdam 1017 EM, Tel.: +31 20 – 344 62 00, Fax: +31 20 – 344 62 01, e-mail: info@bfkw.nl

Prof. Dr. Liesbeth Zegveld studied law at Utrecht. She obtained her doctorate with distinction in 2000 and was sworn in as an attorney in Amsterdam the same year. In 2005 she became a partner at Böhler Franken Koppe Wijngaarden, where she is a member of the international law & human rights department. She has written many articles on issues in the field of international humanitarian law. She is a guest lecturer at the University of Amsterdam and a member of the International Law Association’s Committee for Compensation for War Victims. In September 2006 she was appointed professor of International Humanitarian Law, in particular the Rights of Women and Children, at Leiden University.

UNDER THE UN FLAG: THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY AND THE SREBRENICA GENOCIDE

June 1, 2008 2 comments

The cost of this book, including shipping & handling, is 25 Euros (the price does not include Western Union fees). To order this book, please write to: srebrenicabook@yahoo.com

Author: Hasan Nuhanovic
Book: Under the UN Flag: The International Community and the Srebrenica Genocide
Available in: English, Bosnian / 567 pages.
ISBN:
978-9958-728-87-7

Foreword: (By the Dutch Interchurch Peace Council IKV)

This book you are now holding in your hands is an important publication! Numerous are the reports written on the Srebrenica genocide, among which the UN report (1999), the French Parliament report (2001), the Dutch NIOD report (2002), and the report of the Dutch Parliamentary Inquiry on Srebrenica (2003). David Rohde wrote his well-known book “Endgame – The Betrayal and Fall of Srebrenica” (1997), and numerous journalists and authors followed [a.o. Honig & Both (1996), Westerman & Rijs (1997), Matton (2006)]. Dutchbat III commander Thom Karremans wrote a book as well, with the somewhat strange title “Srebrenica. Who cares?” (1998).

But this is a different type of book, incomparable with all of the other publications. It is the first comprehensive presentation of facts and observations from the ranks of the people who suffered most: the Bosniak citizens of and refugees in Srebrenica. It goes well beyond individual eye-witness statements. It combines analyses of books and documents with such statements. And as interpreter for the international forces [Hasan Nuhanovic], he was in person present at numerous important meetings and in contact with many people.

Having in mind the loss of lives of more than 8,000 men and women, primarily the story of the Srebrenica citizens and refugees should be heard across the world. Regrettably, reality shows that this is not the case. We all too often neglect their suffering, and ignore their quest for truth and justice. This has become most visible – in a very painful way – in the discussions in the Netherlands.

Five years ago, the neither Dutch government nor NIOD considered it worthwhile to invite survivors of the Srebrenica genocide to the presentation of the NIOD report on Srebrenica. The parliamentary inquiry commission decided (by majority vote) that it would not be useful to organise special hearings with the survivors – in order to directly get their information, listen to their assessment of events in July 1995. So, we from IKV invited survivors to the NIOD presentation, and we organised over the years regular meetings where they could meet with members of Dutch parliament. So far, the Dutch government has been unwilling – even after the resignation of PM Wim Kok and his cabinet, April 2002, to apologise to the survivors of the Srebrenica genocide for the mistakes made in July 1995… Logically, IKV’s lobby will continue.

The IKV lobby on Srebrenica would not have been possible without the gigantic work that Hasan Nunanovic initiated, that is to collect relevant data, gather and alayse documents, and add the perspective and crucial information from the part of the citizens and refugees in Srebrenica. For this book, Nuhanovic undertook the effort to interview an additional 100 people where other sources remained indecisive or information was not yet available at all. We were happy to support this huge endeavour, with financial means and, where useful, some suggestions or comments on texts. We used the information for our own IKV publication “Srebrenica – The genocide that was not prevented.” (2002)

It is a bitter but inevitable conclusion that the need to listen to the survivors’ voices is as big as ever before, in the Netherlands and elsewhere. What happened in Srebrenica cannot be undone. What we can do is support – to the maximum of our capacities – the campaign for truth and justice that Hasan Nuhanovic and the Srebrenica associations started already many years ago. This book played and must continue to play an important role in that work.

Dion van den Berg
Senior Policy Adviser
IKV Pax Christi

www.ikvpaxchristi.nl

Note: As of January 1st 2007, the Dutch Interchurch Peace Council (IKV) and Pax Christi Netherlands joined forces and now constitute one organisation: IKV Pax Christi.

THE UNITED NATIONS ON SREBRENICA’S PILLAR OF SHAME

May 5, 2008 10 comments

Need assistance with the purchase of this book?
Then, E-mail srebrenicagenocide@live.com

The United Nations on the Srebrenica’s Pillar of Shame
104 testimonies about the role of the UN in genocide against the population of the UN “Srebrenica Safe Haven”

ISBN:978-9958-802-72-0

Total of 418 pages, available in English (212 pages) and Bosnian (204 pages)
Published in 2007 on the 11th Anniversary of the Genocide Committed Against the Bosniaks of the “UN Safe Zone” of Srebrenica.

The book can be purchased directly from the NGO Association Women of Srebrenica. If you need more information you can contact them at:

Mailing address:
Women of Srebrenica / Zene Srebrenica
Filipa Kljajića 38, 75000 Tuzla
Bosnia-Herzegovina
(EUROPE)

Office Phone #: ++387 (0)35 251 498
E-mail:office@srebrenica.ba

(click photo to see higher resolution image)

(ORIGINAL) FOREWORD FROM THE BOOK:

The book of statements (testimonies) named “The United Nations on the Srebrenica’s Pillar of Shame,” which speaks about responsibility of the international community, is only a bit of what has happened and we have been through in the “UN Srebrenica Safe Haven.” The “Women of Srebrenica” Citizens Association has worked on this project for nearly two years in order to question responsibility of some individuals from the international community, to hand over the book to the Hague Tribunal, and to make possible that responsible individuals be indicted.

The book was handed over to Carla Del Ponte, the Chief Prosecutor at the Tribunal, and yet no individual from the international community was indicted. We met Carla Del Ponte and asked whether she had studied the material and whether she had found any grounds for indictments against individuals who could have prevented genocide in the “UN Srebrenica Safe Haven,” but they would not do it; she responded that there was no grounds for indictments and that is how it all ended.

The fact is that the Association was not optimistic in first place that there would be any indictments, knowing that the Tribunal was founded by the UN, so as the UN itself would have to be indicted, as well as some countries involved in the events in Srebrenica area.

Our gratitude for the book – “The United Nations on the Srebrenica’s Pillar of Shame, 104 testimonies about the role of the UN in genocide against the population of the UN Srebrenica Safe Haven” = goes to the IKV NGO in Netherlands, which has been giving us moral and financial support for a few years.

This collection of the statements made by the 107 witnesses, that is, persons who survived the genocide, is only a tiny bit of what happened there in sigh of the UNPROFOR’s Dutch battalion; the battalion had a mandate to protect the Srebrenica’s population during the war, and yet they turned a blind eye and did nothing to protect the suffering people of the Srebrenica enclave.

The witnesses’ statements were collected between January of 2001 and June of 2002.

This book’s aim is to present the role of the international factors – such as UNPROFOR, UN, NATO, EU, the British SAS, the French Government and Ministry of Defence, and the Dutch Government and Ministry of Defence – in the events that took place in the “UN Srebrenica Safe Haven” during July of 1995.

Each statement has an audio record and a hard copy transcript signed by the witness, and it is altogether kept in the Association’s archive.

Hidajet Kardasevic, who himself survived the genocide and who knows other survivors, lives now in the United States. With cooperation and guidance of the “Women of Srebrenica” Citizens Association, Hidajet interviewed the 104 witnesses.

The collection of the 104 witnesses’ statements confirms responsibility of the international factors. However, the investigations at the Hague Tribunal have not so far addressed the issue of responsibility and guilt of the international factors, either those present in the field and involved in the events or those having direct or indirect influence over the events.

As an appendix to this book, there are the last two screams for help of Nihad Nino Catic, a radio reporter from Srebrenica who reported on a daily basis about an alarming situation in Srebrenica that was getting worse by the minute; he was begging for help for people who died at each step being unarmed, hungry, thirsty, and barefoot.

Listening to Nino’s report form 10 of July 1995, I cannot help it to make another note. Reporting for the BiH Radio, he said that the Chetniks had already entered a Srebrenica suburb, which was correct (I was there myself). However, two hours later, in a 12 o’clock news, the UN observers reported that ‘the situation was calming down.’ It was another lie in a series of thousands that the UN observers reported to their superiors at the UN offices in Sarajevo, Zagreb, New York, and who knows where else.

“Women of Srebrenica”
Citizen Association, Tuzla 2007

NO IMMUNITY FOR GENOCIDE

November 28, 2007 2 comments

COURT DISMISSES LEGAL IMMUNITY FOR THE UNITED NATIONS and NETHERLANDS

Did you know? Little girl Meliha Efendic was only 8 years old when she was killed during Srebrenica genocide. Little boy Bego Begic was only 6 years old when he was killed by the Serb soldiers during the massacre. His 14 year old brother – also named Bego – was executed, but they were not the only victims of genocide. Thanks to the failures of the United Nations in Srebrenica, close to 500 children under the age of 18 were executed cold style during the massacre. At least 8,000 Bosniaks were killed; many bodies were thrown into the river Drina and will likely never be recovered. So far, “Death Valley” region yielded over 4,200 corpses.

Full article continues below…

Banner contains photo of indicted war criminal on the run – Gen Ratko Mladic – and a message: “Thanks to NL (Netherlands)”. In 1995, the U.N. Dutch peacekeepers stood helplessly when Serb forces massacred over 8,000 Srebrenica refugees who sought help in the U.N. Compound of Potocari. The Dutch state has always said its troops were abandoned by the U.N. which gave them no air support, but public documents show a network of Dutch military officials within the U.N. blocked air support because they feared their soldiers could be hit by friendly fire.

“The U.N. has the duty to prevent genocide. An appeal to immunity in a case of genocide, as in the Srebrenica drama, is irreconcilable with the U.N.’s own objectives and its international obligations.”

Dutch court ruled Tuesday that the United Nations and the Netherlands should face trial for the 1995 Srebrenica genocide, Bosnian lawyer Semir Guzin confirmed in Sarajevo.

Guzin told local Bosnian media that the county court based in The Hague had set a legal precedent, dismissing UN legal immunity in the case in which more than 6,000 survivors of the massacre sued the world organization and the Dutch government for failing to protect them.

On July 11, 1995, units of the Bosnian Serb Army led by General Ratko Mladic overran the Dutch peacekeeping forces protecting Bosniak refugees in the UN “safe area” of Srebrenica and began the systematic execution of over 8,000 men and boys, close to 500 of them were underage children.

Many of Srebrenica refugees were rounded up, separated from their families and shot on the spot or in the neighboring villages.

Others, who tried to make their ways through Serb-captured territory, were captured later and executed or shelled and gunned down in ambushes.

While the massacre was unfolding in vicinity of the U.N. peacekeepers, the leader of the United Nations’ Dutch contingent went on to drink a toast with Serb general Ratko Mladic (photo on the left).

Although some of the perpetrators have been since sentenced or are standing trial at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia in The Hague, these actions, the largest genocide in Europe since the end of the Second World War, took place amidst the silent neglect of most of the international community.

The main architects of the slaughter – Radovan Karadzic and Gen. Ratko Mladic – still remain at large.

Instead of preventing the massacre, the Dutch even actively participated in the selection and separation of Bosnian women and men and their forcible removal and detention. The Bosniak men, elderly, and underage boys were almost all murdered.

Quick recap from eye-witness testimonies (warning: graphic content):

Quote Start: The Serbs began to “march girls and young women away from the group of refugees. They were raped.” ….A Dutch soldier stood by and watched as the women were raped, even listening to music on his Walkman…. A Serb [soldier], says Subasic, “told the mother to make the child stop crying. But when the baby continued to cry, he took it from the mother and slit its throat. Then he laughed. A Dutch soldier also witnessed the murder of the baby, she says, and yet he “didn’t react at all”… The Muslim men, some as young as 12, were almost all murdered. The scenes that transpired in the camp are indescribable. The Serbs would pick out girls from groups. “I saw the Bosnian women begging the Dutchbat soldiers to bring the girls back,” Kadira Gabeljic, one of the plaintiffs, recalls. But they only responded: “no, no, no.” Ramiza Gurdic, another plaintiff, witnessed an incident that she is unlikely to ever forget. She describes a scene in which a 10-year-old boy was placed in his mother’s lap and literally slaughtered. “His little head was chopped off, and the body remained in the mother’s lap.” Quote End

Over 8,000 Bosniak men were massacred after Bosnian Serb troops captured the town of Srebrenica on July 11, 1995, during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The former eastern Bosniak enclave was at that time a UN safe haven and was under the protection of Dutch UN troops. Over 8,000 victims of Srebrenica genocide were dug into mass graves, only to be reburied at different locations later in an attempt to hide the crime (see photo below).

“For the first time the UN will have to show up in a process in which many things about wrong moves taken in Srebrenica are to be explained,” said Guzin, a member of the Bosnian legal team representing the Mothers of Srebrenica association.

The decision of the court to dismiss UN legal immunity, he said, would now help create a better position for a possible agreement between the Srebrenica survivors and the accused side — the UN and the Netherlands.

“I am happy. Justice will finally find its place,” Munira Subasic of the Srebrenica mothers’ association said, adding that the genocide in Srebrenica happened under the UN flag.

The Mothers of Srebrenica, represented by Bosnian and international lawyers, three years ago sued the UN and the Dutch government demanding 1 billion dollars’ compensation for their failure to prevent the massacre and protect innocent civilians in Srebrenica.

A court in the Hague ruled the case could proceed, dismissing pleas by public prosecutors that it should be dropped after the United Nations invoked its legal immunity and said it would not take part.

Lawyer Marco Gerritsen, representing the victims’ families, said on Tuesday the court had supported their argument that the U.N. could not be granted automatic immunity.

“The U.N. has the duty to prevent genocide. An appeal to immunity in a case of genocide, as in the Srebrenica drama, is irreconcilable with the U.N.’s own objectives and its international obligations,” he added in a statement.

Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic and former Bosnian Serb Army chief Ratko Mladic, both wanted by the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague on genocide charges over Srebrenica, are still on the run.

Dismayed by the failure to bring to justice the two chief suspects, victims’ families say they have turned to a Dutch court for recognition and redress for the tragedy.

The Dutch state has always said its troops were abandoned by the U.N. which gave them no air support, but public documents show a network of Dutch military officials within the U.N. blocked air support because they feared their soldiers could be hit by friendly fire, the families’ lawyers said.

In 2002 the entire Dutch government of former prime minister Wim Kok resigned. During his visit to Srebrenica in 2002, Wim Kok expressed remorse, but refused to apologize.

Process of DNA-identification of Srebrenica massacre victims. Photo by the ICMP (the International Commission on Missing Persons).

Photo Caption: Personal remains of Srebrenica massacre victims. Photo by the ICMP (the Internationa Commission on Missing Persons).

Photo Caption: Log books at the Tuzla Center of the International Commission on Missing Persons. Photo by Iain Page, 2004.